Summary:

China’s Yingli Green Energy today announced new supply contracts with Germany’s IBC Solar; it also clarified its 2009 shipment outlook after one of its executives apparently gave out some wrong numbers earlier this week. Reuters reported on Wednesday that Yingli expects its shipments of solar modules […]

China’s Yingli Green Energy today announced new supply contracts with Germany’s IBC Solar; it also clarified its 2009 shipment outlook after one of its executives apparently gave out some wrong numbers earlier this week.

Reuters reported on Wednesday that Yingli expects its shipments of solar modules to reach 400 MW next year, well below Yingli’s previously stated target of 600 MW. Reuters attributed its info to Cherradi Nabih, Yingli’s vice president for manufacturing, who chatted with the wire service on the sidelines of a Clinton Global Initiative meeting in Hong Kong.

Yingli didn’t mention the Reuters story in its statement today, saying only that it was responding to “certain recent news articles.” But while Yingli called the lower number erroneous, the solar firm also backed away from its firm 600 MW target, saying instead that it estimates its total photovoltaic module shipments for 2009 will range from 550 MW to 600 MW. Yingli added that the shipment target is subject to the successful installation and ramp-up of its planned 200 MW expansion in the third quarter of 2009.

As for IBC, Yingli said it’s inked two contracts to supply IBC with a total of 91 megawatts of photovoltaic modules starting this month and running through December 2009. Financial terms of the deals were not disclosed.

This is Yingli’s second deal with IBC; the company signed a contract in May to supply the firm with 35 MW of photovoltaic modules. That deal runs through this month, but also includes an option for IBC to buy up to an additional 45 MW of modules for 2009. It’s not clear if today’s deals include a similar option.

Yingli’s last photovoltaic module supply deal was announced in October, when it said it won a bid to supply 1.5 MW of modules to state-owned China Mobile Communications. Yingli said it has been working with China Mobile since 2002, when it helped the mobile phone operator build some solar-powered base stations in western China.

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