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Summary:

I live and die by my Google calendar and have always hated the fact that I could not wirelessly sync it with my iPhone. I’ve tried every method in the book, and finally have found two methods to wirelessly sync your Google calendar to your iPhone. […]

I live and die by my Google calendar and have always hated the fact that I could not wirelessly sync it with my iPhone. I’ve tried every method in the book, and finally have found two methods to wirelessly sync your Google calendar to your iPhone.

NuevaSync

The first method is free and uses a service called NuevaSync. NuevaSync allows over the air synchronization to the built in iPhone calendar. It seems like a great service, but I could never get it to work because it requires the iPhone Exchange account to work (you are only allowed to have one Exchange account per phone and mine is used for work email). My roomate has successfully set it up on his phone and he reports that it works well. NuevaSync does not require the user to install any third party software, but does require the user to create an account on the NuevaSync website (security risks?). Instructions for configuring NuevaSync can be found here.

SaiSuke

The second method, SaiSuke, can be purchased from the iTunes App store for $10 and installs a separate calendaring application on the iPhone. After downloading and installing, it literally took me five minutes to set up (set up your Gmail username and password inside the iPhone menu Settings > SaiSuke). The program allows you to toggle which Google calendars are visible, and whether you want to sync 1 way Google-to-iPhone only, 1 way iPhone-to-Google only, or 2 ways. The color coding of the calendars stays intact, making reading a whole lot easier. There are a myriad of views including: list, day, week, month, and year, but I tend to stay in the default month view with the summary of the day below.

If you can get away with using NuevaSync, and do not mind giving your Gmail username and password to a new kid on the block, then try out NuevaSync. If you want a more robust, secure method, I highly recommend SaiSuke.

  1. Nemus sync for the jail broken phones is a boon for over the air sync

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  2. “but does require the user to create an account on the NuevaSync website (security risks?)”

    What?! I use Nuevasync and it uses Google’s token authorisation (similar to authorising apps to connect to your Flickr account) meaning the Nuevasync team only have access to the data you enable eg. calendar data, not your Google username and password.

    No need to put people off a great service just because you haven’t actually used it and don’t fully understand it!

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  3. Nuevasync account information:

    When you register with Nuevasync, we will request some personal information, including your first and last name, email address, a username, and password to create your account. You are not required to provide your name. We use your name only to greet you personally if we need to communicate with you. Your username, e-mail address and password are required to provide the service.

    Provider account credentials

    When you configure a provider for your Nuevasync account (for example Google calendar) you give us your provider username and credentials (either your password or a security token depending on the authentication system used by the provider). We use these credentials only to access your information in the provider’s service on your behalf, in order to provide the syncronization service.

    (In the case of Google, security tokens are used).

    Taken from http://www.nuevasync.com/policies/privacy.html

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  4. I do this by running BusySync on my desktop, then letting MobileMe do its thing – this has a couple of advantages in that a) there are no third parties involved and b) I only need to configure one machine for sync in order to have it available on my phone, laptop, home desktop and office desktop with a minimum of hassle.

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  5. Hm – I use the integrated caldav synchronization of iCal to my Google calendars and MobileMe. That works great for my multiple Macs AND the iPhone.

    So it seems I don’t understand why we need another app…

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  6. @Andy Fuchs – MobileMe will sync your CalDAV calendars? For me, it will only sync calendars that it thinks are local – how did you get that working?

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  7. @ Andy Fuchs – an additional app (or rather, service in the case of nuevasync) can be useful if your situation suits it – for instance my Fiance and I are subscribed to each other’s Gcal, and the minute one of us adds an item on the iphone it is available on both our iPhones. No syncing to the computer or MobileMe required.

    I don’t quite follow exactly how your setup works, all I know is using NS to handle the sync-to-iPhone part negates the need to pay for MobileMe, making this a free setup.

    Obviously MobileMe is much more than calendar sync, but the only thing I ‘Need’ that it offers is calendar sync. So might as well use a free solution for that!

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  8. [...] One is NuevaSync, which is completely free but requires registering for an account. The other is SaiSuke, which costs $10 but offers many more settings to set things up exactly how you need to. Read the complete review on TheAppleBlog. [...]

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  9. The only that is bad about NuevaSync besides the security issues is that you can’t sync multiple calenders!:( If you could, I would actually use it!

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  10. I have my home (iCal) and work (Exchange) calendars syncs with Google Calendars already. For iCal, I use caldav (weren’t you guys the ones that suggested it?). For Exchange, I use Google Calendar Sync. Works great for me…I like using Google Calendars to manage events, but I feel the iPhone Calendars interface is more convenient than the Google Calendars iPhone Web app. I wish Google Apps were available as native iPhone apps but given Andriod I can understand why they are not motivated to do this.

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