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Summary:

YouTube got 344 million global unique visitors in October. The site’s audience was disproportionately from Europe as compared to the web’s worldwide audience, with 37.8 percent of its visitors from Europe.

Not that you didn’t already know that YouTube commands an audience all over the world, but here are the numbers that prove it.

ComScore hasn’t given out U.S. video measurements since July (the delay is apparently because it’s in the process of expanding its video measurement techniques so it can measure ads vs. content, premium vs. user-generated content, and other distinctions). But venture capitalist Fred Wilson (who until earlier this year sat on comScore’s board) was able to rustle up some October worldwide numbers to prove a point he was making in a blog post about YouTube’s audience compared to oldteevee’s.

youtube_worldwide

Never ones to let some online video stats pass us by, we’re republishing the chart here. So, what can we learn?

YouTube got 344 million global unique visitors in October. (Holy crap.)

YouTube’s audience is disproportionately European compared to the web’s worldwide audience. It gets 37.8 percent of its visitors from Europe, which has only 28 percent of the total web audience. By contrast, YouTube gets 22.5 percent of its visitors from Asia, whereas they comprise 40 percent of the total web audience. (Note that Wilson broke some countries out from their regions, so the chart’s percents don’t all add up to 100.)

Couple caveats here: comScore’s strongest and most consistent measurements are in the U.S. — and that’s what we’re used to seeing. Also, these are its “Media Metrix,” which aren’t specially adjusted for the way online video works like its “Video Metrix.” The video-specific measurements focus on number of streams rather than views, and include streams of embedded video around the web. Embeds comprise a significant portion of YouTube’s video views, and wouldn’t be counted in these numbers.

But unique visitors are still the way much of the web measures itself, and 344 million is a whole freaking lot of them.

  1. [...] Not that you didn’t already know that YouTube commands an audience all over the world, but here are the numbers that prove it. ComScore hasn’t given out U.S. video measurements since July (the delay is apparently because it’s in the process of Video Web Hosting Data [...]

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  2. [...] Ave. that the site is advertiser-friendly. After all, the company needs to start monetizing those 344 million global uniques. The vestiges of the Wild, Wild West, video free-for-all that YouTube once was are disappearing, [...]

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  3. Liz- what is missing from all this analysis is: how much of those uniques on YouTube.com come from search – in particular, Google Search? Would be an interesting breakout.

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  4. [...] YouTube continues to be a chaotic melange, only bigger and broader than ever before. The site had 344 million global unique visitors in [...]

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  5. [...] was not as important as having as many people as possible watching video. Maybe YouTube feels that 344 million uniques a month is enough, because in recent months they’ve reversed that stance, offering [...]

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  6. [...] Paradebeispiel ist da YouTube: Die Videoplattform hat zwar unglaublich hohe Traffic-Werte und Besucherzahlen, macht aber auch grosse Verluste, weil bis jetzt noch kein gut funktionierendes Werbe-Modell [...]

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