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[qi:076] That’s my personal struggle, but you could insert many all-consuming tasks — such as starting up a company, or training for the Olympics — for blogging and still get to the heart of my question. Most people believe good blogging is about two things: personality and […]

[qi:076] That’s my personal struggle, but you could insert many all-consuming tasks — such as starting up a company, or training for the Olympics — for blogging and still get to the heart of my question. Most people believe good blogging is about two things: personality and passion. But where does that leave me, a professional news writer who’s passionate about technology — but not to the point where I want to think about it 24 hours a day?

Technology isn’t my single-minded passion, mostly because I have this other passion in life — my two-year-old daughter — but anyone else with a life outside of their blog seems doomed to failure under that formula. I suppose I could be a mommy blogger with a heavy focus on technology, but in truth, it really is the hardcore sciences and learning about technology that I love. So my passions are pretty much destined to never meet — unless I want to implant an RFID or GPS chip in my kid. Maybe when she starts driving. On Monday, Om sent over a nice read about what makes a good blog post from 43 Folders that summarizes the personality and passion requirements quite nicely. But I was drawn more to a New York Times article on slow blogging written on Friday. While the idea of posting a few times a month seems self-indulgent for a professional reporter, there’s a lot of value in taking the time to think a post through. Passion and personality are no substitute for innovative thinking and well-researched points of view.

So as I sit down with my family for a much-needed vacation during the rest of the week and let up-to-the-minute blogging slide, I am also taking some time to think about a few topics that really interest me, such as privacy, home networking, broadband pricing and regulation, and where the chip industry might be in the next five years. Feel free to send your thoughts on those topics or tell me how you guys manage to juggle multiple passions — or if you think passion is the key to great blogging, even. Almost a year into this gig, I still haven’t figured it out.

  1. Stacy,

    Yes you can. You have an hour in the morning and in the eveinging, maybe even an hour at noon.

    Keep up the good work.

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  2. You can be a good parent and a good blogger, absolutely. Blogging, whether it is a hobby or a profession takes time, and so does parenting. It’s just a matter of time management, and making time for all that needs to get done. I’ve tried to continue blogging at a good pace, even with 5-month old twins, but sometimes it means writing after they are asleep, or bouncing kids while typing. Robert Scoble is another example, with Milan and his older son, Patrick.

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  3. I have stopped thinking in terms of “either or”. First, there is no need to be “good” at blogging and parenting. You can be an average or not so good. Second, every thing has it’s moment in our life, we live every moment. So, I do not bother about being good at. For me, living and enjoying a moment is more important!

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  4. I am far from a good parent. If it weren’t for my kids’ moms I wouldn’t be able to do 1/10th the blogging I can. Blogging is best when it is passionate and authoritative. It isn’t for everyone but I work my passions together. When my 14-year-old son was able to argue with the FCC Commissioner about censorship and child protection issues in a polite and credible way I knew he will be all right in whatever he chooses to do in life.

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  5. What is blogging these days? I dont think that it is still a *requirement* to engage your audience by responding to comments in real time as they come in 24×7 from time zones across the globe. You’re no longer expected to be a lone wolf beating the establishment. If you blog needs to post at 4am PST then there is a team perhaps in other parts of the world that can let you sleep.

    These days you can be a blogger from 9 to 5 (or 8 to 8 anyway) just like a normal job. That doesn’t make it any easier to be good at your job and a good parent at the same time. But there is plenty of evidence that this is possible, not easy, but possible anyway.

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  6. Some of the best parents I know are also bloggers. With 4 kids, I certainly try, and IMO forcing myself to learn to balance and organize has made me a better person, and I think a better person. Look at Phil Burns – http://phil801.com/wpblog – he has 10 kids, and his daughter has Leukemia, yet he’s one of the better bloggers I know. He’s taken a break recently with his daughter’s leukemia, but frankly, I think it’s the ability to multi-task that also allows us to know when to take a break as well to focus on what matters most.

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  7. [...] me ha gustado mucho un artículo de Stacey Higginbotham (Gigaom) en el que se pregunta si se puede ser al mismo tiempo buena madre y buena [...]

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  8. I was captivated by your reference to slow blogging; a movement us born! I have a deep need for responsible, well thought out blogging. I have no need whatsoever for more Mommy blogs. Look at Hendrik Hertzberg’s blog for the New Yorker online – it’s an example of perfect and passionate slow blogging with plenty of his sublime personality.

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  9. Stacey,

    I am no where’s near the writer you are, however, I was asked a similar question in a blog article by the IT Skeptic. Here is the question and answer if you are interested…

    Skep: Your blog intermingles life and work. Some say this is the future as the distinction disappears. Others say it is unhealthy. What are your views?

    John: This is a great question. They say blogging is like having Tourette Syndrome. You can say anything you want and who cares what it sounds like. When I started my blog, I really had no agenda. I figured I would ramble about IT management and if no one listened that would be fine. I am also a wannabe entrepreneur and I am always looking at new technologies to blog about. In the Tourette model I just can’t keep my mouth shut when I see something interesting, even if it doesn’t have anything to do with IT management. I also have two boys, 5 and 9, and I am very interested in education technologies as well. Somewhere along the way I started interjecting personal and family stories as blog articles. After I started getting a little bit of a following on my blog, I thought I should really take my blog more seriously. I thought of dropping the personal and silly stories and sticking with more of a marketing focus on IT management. Then one day I ran into a very successful PR person at an airport lounge and she told me that she loved my blog and that she reads it religiously. I told her that I thought I should stop doing what I call “Silly Stories” on my blog because it might not seem professional. She then asked me, “Is the blog your job or your hobby?”. I told her I really didn’t know the answer to that question. She then told me “The reason I like your blog is because it’s you!” and that’s what, in her opinion, makes it great. Then I realized why I created the blog in the first place. For now I guess my blog is just a hobby and I therefore I will just keep having a lot of fun doing it.

    For me blogging would not be fun and I wouldn’t waste my time if I couldn’t jot down what ever was in my head at the time it hits me.

    John
    johnmwillis.com

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  10. I think passion definitely is the key. I really want to maintain both a professional and a personal blog – there is so much I want to share, say, discuss with others, etc. But I guess my passion level isn’t high enough for me, after my regular work hours and the bit of social networking I squeeze in, to take another hour or so away from my husband and two teenagers, to devote myself to blogging. Sometimes it makes me feel a bit deficient in my professional arena — after all, doesn’t everybody who’s anybody have both a hefty social networking and blogging reputation? I’m still struggling with the social networking time! Then I think of passions and priorities and I see my kids, not my computer.

    Does that mean that those of you with a passion for digital life are bad parents? I don’t think so. But I do think that, if you want some semblence of balance, you need to work a little extra hard to carve some time away from the computer screen, just as I need to work a little harder to carve out some digital time.

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