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Summary:

When I wrote my post asking whatever happened to wireless USB our buds at GigaOM were reporting on the death of WiQuest, the major player in the Ultra-Wideband (UWB) world behind that technology.  The timing of our two posts is a bit ironic as I was […]

When I wrote my post asking whatever happened to wireless USB our buds at GigaOM were reporting on the death of WiQuest, the major player in the Ultra-Wideband (UWB) world behind that technology.  The timing of our two posts is a bit ironic as I was writing my post about the same time that Stacey was writing hers.  She reported that the Texan company WiQuest is shutting its doors due to the inability to make UWB a viable product for the market.  According to EE Times the company couldn’t resolve the technical difficulties in bringing the wireless technology to market and the chips they produced to do so were not accepted by those who would use them.  The primary problems were two-fold, their wireless USB solution required two chips instead of a single one that would be needed for adoption and that it required a full Watt of power, a death-knell in the world of mobile computing.  Where wireless USB will go from here is not clear at all but it seems my question about it was timely as it is even further from appearing in a viable form than I thought.

  1. turn.self.off Monday, November 3, 2008

    time for someone to rewrite the laws of physics, i guess.

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  2. yeah same question harries here also let me ask to http://www.apps4rent.com/index.htm

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  3. the end before it started for the most promissing technology, that would push the true mobility foreward. Really sad. Hopefully there are other competetors out there catch the train, give it some speed!

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  4. I thought Dell and Lenovo were shipping models with integrated UWB already?

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  5. Calling WiQuest a major UWB player is going a bit far. They are just the first company in the space to fold up shop without a buyer. More to follow, I would guess.

    When the major proponent of Wireless USB (Intel) decides to cease development, pretty much everyone else is destined to fail. Without UWB built into motherboard chipsets, you’re never going to see economies of scale and widespread deployment.

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  6. I saw an ad for the Kensington Wireless USB Docking Station. How well does it work?

    http://us.kensington.com/html/16131.html

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