16 Comments

Summary:

EETimes reported that Ultra-wideband startup WiQuest has shut its doors. This is a sad day for the more than 120 employees of the Allen, Texas chipmaker and unfortunate for the venture backers who put at least $54 million in the wireless networking company, but it’s something we should prepare to see more of as the wave of startups backing that standard finally run out of money and compelling arguments for the technology

While I was out trick-or-treating with my daughter, EETimes reported that Ultra-wideband startup WiQuest had shut its doors. This is a sad day for the more than 120 employees of the Allen, Texas chipmaker, and unfortunate for the venture backers who put at least $54 million in the wireless networking company, but it’s something we should prepare to see more of as the wave of startups backing that technology finally run out of money and compelling arguments for UWB. If the supposed No. 1 vendor in a space can’t hack it, I have little faith in the others.

Not that UWB couldn’t have been a good personal wireless networking technology, with its promise of 480 Mbps data rates delivered over a few feet, but it was stymied by a standards war that dragged on forever, causing products to hit the market late. Those products offered the ability to connect computer peripherals wirelessly–something already accomplished via Wi-Fi or Bluetooth–and people found them underwhelming. Then those late first-generation products didn’t even perform as advertised, often transmitting data at less than half the rate the promised speeds.

Vendors weren’t impressed. I watched an executive from Microsoft stand up at a meeting of UWB executives earlier this year, and basically yell at them for delivering an clunky product that didn’t work. Ironically it was a demonstration from WiQuest that showed a UWB-connected monitor at that meeting, that seemed to provide the most compelling case for UWB.

But to build that case the chips needed to be cheap enough to justify their addition to laptops, displays and other products. To get costs down, chip startups needed to sell a lot of chips–something they can’t do unless there’s a large market demand for the technology (or a huge vendor like Intel pushing it). Perhaps if other UWB startups hang on, and can launch a second generation product, we may see companies such as Alereon, Wisair, TZero Technologies and Staccato Communications keep going, but I’m not going to hold my breath.

Even Radiospire, a UWB chipmaker aiming to use the technology to deliver HD video to televisions has seemingly shifted gears, offering 60 GHz schips for video transfer. Maybe others can make similar transitions, and avoid WiQuest’s fate. Wisair and Tzero did manage to raise more money earlier this year, which gives them some breathing room.

You’re subscribed! If you like, you can update your settings

  1. Roundup: Campaign enters last weekend, specter of deflation looms, tech layoffs soar » VentureBeat Saturday, November 1, 2008

    [...] A technology on its last legs — Ultra-wideband wireless networking technology loses promoter as WiQuest shuts down. [...]

  2. Confirmed: WiQuest.com Officially Closed Its Doors | FuckedStartups Saturday, November 1, 2008

    [...] reports it (here)… and from EETimes (here) This is a sad day for the more than 120 employees of the Allen, [...]

  3. If UWB is going down the drain then what technology should prevail for short distances high throughput PAN like networks. Getting rid of all these cables behind home theaters sounded like a great proposition to me.

  4. Ultra-Wideband At Death’s Door? – Standards dispute claims another startup…. | Voip Blog Sunday, November 2, 2008

    [...] or coaxial). Unfortunately UWB has been bogged down in a standards war for many years, and now GigaOM notes that the technology has seen better days, as UWB startup WiQuest this week closed its doors [...]

  5. Stacey Higginbotham Monday, November 3, 2008

    Laurent, Wi-Fi wants to be both a PAN and a video networking option. Also for video there’s WHDI using 5GHz and Wireless HD at 60 GHz. Here are two stories outlining these:
    video: http://gigaom.com/2008/04/09/wireless-hd-is-the-new-front-in-a-standards-war/
    Wi-Fi: http://gigaom.com/2008/08/15/vcs-hope-to-see-wi-fi-everywhere/

  6. Ultra-Wideband At Death’s Door? – Standards dispute claims another startup…. | remove the labels | Gadgets and Life Monday, November 3, 2008

    [...] or coaxial). Unfortunately UWB has been bogged down in a standards war for many years, and now GigaOM notes that the technology has seen better days, as UWB startup WiQuest this week closed its doors [...]

  7. Will ultra-wideband high-speed wireless technology ever find its market? » VentureBeat Wednesday, November 5, 2008

    [...] week, the wireless chip start-up WiQuest shut its doors as its VC backers decided to give up on the maker of ultra-wideband wireless chips. The closure of [...]

  8. Gadget» Blog Archive » Intel Done With Ultra Wideband Development, Leaving it for Dead [Wireless] Wednesday, November 5, 2008

    [...] consumer products, a healthy dose of public apathy and a lack of integrated support from most major electronics companies doesn’t leave much [...]

  9. Efinditnow › Intel Done With Ultra Wideband Development, Leaving it for Dead [Wireless] Thursday, November 6, 2008

    [...] consumer products, a healthy dose of public apathy and a lack of integrated support from most major electronics companies doesn’t leave much [...]

  10. Ultra-wideband Decline Proves Perils of Chip Investment – GigaOM Thursday, November 6, 2008

    [...] its doors when it was unable to raise more money or find a buyer for its technology. That led to heralds of doom for Ultra-wideband, with analysts and media blaming long-delayed product launches, expensive chips and a hostile [...]

  11. Ultra-wideband Players Get $20M to Merge – GigaOM Thursday, November 20, 2008

    [...] have my doubts about the future of UWB, the high-speed personal area networking technology, after the closure of UWB chipmaker WiQuest, the bankruptcy of UWB chip firm Focus Enhancements and [...]

  12. New Ultra-Wide Band Storage Device: The Leyio | PSFK Monday, January 26, 2009

    [...] expanded and improved in recent years.  Now a new device, dubbed the Leyio, hopes to push the rarely used ultra-wide band technology into a new direction for communication with digital data.  The premise [...]

  13. UWB Meltdown Continues, WiMedia Alliance Disbands Tuesday, March 17, 2009

    [...] comments Technology standards don’t die a quick death in most cases. For years after the market has abandoned a failed standard, it still exists in orphaned products hoping for eventual resurrection. Yesterday, EETimes reported [...]

  14. UWB Meltdown Continues, WiMedia Alliance Disbands « Ads Sanrego Tuesday, March 17, 2009

    [...] standards don’t die a quick death in most cases. For years after the market has abandoned a failed standard, it still exists in orphaned products hoping for eventual resurrection. Yesterday, EETimes reported [...]

  15. Standards wars…figures, well there goes my easy solution for my gaming device. Looks like my prototype is a one of with this news. Maybe I can find the D-link version alot cheaper than 200 bucks now…ebay discount shopping time unless I figure something better to use for wireless data.

  16. 802.11n To Win The Wireless HD Video Sweepstakes Wednesday, April 29, 2009

    [...] Malik | Wednesday, April 29, 2009 | 6:32 AM PT | 0 comments Given that the wireless networking technology Ultrawideband (UWB) is on its deathbed and WirelessHD and WHDI are yet to gain any real momentum, it seems that the winner of wireless HD [...]

Comments have been disabled for this post