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Summary:

Asus isn’t the only one riding high on the growth of the netbook market. MSI originally expected to move half-a-million Wind netbooks this year, but they’ve revised their forecast. The company figures to sell between 600,000 and 700,000 units before year end. Yup, it’s just a […]

MsiwindAsus isn’t the only one riding high on the growth of the netbook market. MSI originally expected to move half-a-million Wind netbooks this year, but they’ve revised their forecast. The company figures to sell between 600,000 and 700,000 units before year end. Yup, it’s just a a "nascent market". ;) I’d actually love to know how many 3-cell battery units vs. 6-cell battery units were sold. I’m sure the vast majority are the lesser capacity, but I’m also betting a majority of folks would prefer the higher capacity.

I find it amazing when I think about the UMPC market just two years ago: with all device models combined, it likely didn’t hit a few hundred thousand units sold. It’s also actually telling that the Wind has replaced my Samsung Q1 Ultra Premium as my primary mobile device too. And that’s a tough pill to swallow considering how much I’ve enjoyed using my UMPCs. I’m going to have to ponder that one for a while and figure out why I’m keeping the Wind in my bag while the Q1UP is playing second fiddle.

  1. Kevin, I gave up my Q1P a year ago and went back to my Acer C110, which is very similar to a netbook. You can read the details of why on my blob, but it really came down to two things, the larger screen and the keyboard.

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  2. I too have been feeling the pull of the Netbook.

    My Fujitsu U810 which I love for its small size is just not the right mobile product for how I work 99% of the time.

    I need a screen and keyboard that will allow me to work effectively on spreadsheet and presentation documents, and I find that the only time that I use tablet mode, is to review items more comfortably.

    I have been holding out, but last night I found I had to reinstall XP, and am left with the prospect of hours on the phone persuading Microsoft that I am now reinstalling the licenses on the same machine rather than using them on a new computer.

    Let’s see if I can wait long enough to see if HP upgrade the 2133, but the Wind is looking mighty tempting.

    Perhaps I can pick up Matt Miller’s in a few weeks time on E-Bay when he gets bored of his!

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  3. It’s the built in keyboard. Touchscreen devices certainly have their advantages. But being able to whip a machine out of your back and enter text without a hassle and without using a Bluetooth or USB keyboard is also nice.

    What I’m really looking forward to are cheaper convertable min-tablets like the next generation Classmate PC. I think we’ll get the best of both worlds with them.

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  4. My Q1 is doing the same thing these days. I have it sitting on my desktop as a media device now. I think the built in keyboard really did it for me. The Q1 is a great device and I love the whole UMPC form factor but my Wind has taken over my portable needs.

    It would be interesting to see Samsung or one of the other manufacturers put the Atom chip into a UMPC. In the end I think the touch screen is great but it brings the price point up too far and the netbooks seem to have hit the sweet spot.

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  5. Can you imagine how many UMPCs would have been sold if they too had been sold at a decent price?

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  6. Boca,

    I sold my Fujitsu U810 and bought a MSI Wind 6-cell. I am hoping to see a swivel-screen netbook with a 9-10 inch screen.

    BTW, after having the U810 for about 8 months, I nearly got the same price for it that I paid in the beginning.

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