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Summary:

A little over a six weeks ago, I finally switched to an iPhone 3G – I’d been holding out for the white 16GB model to arrive in the UK and pounced as soon as they started to arrive at O2 stores. I’ve been as enchanted with […]

A little over a six weeks ago, I finally switched to an iPhone 3G – I’d been holding out for the white 16GB model to arrive in the UK and pounced as soon as they started to arrive at O2 stores.

I’ve been as enchanted with the mix of goofy and useful applications from the iTunes App Store as anyone else. Initially, I sought to find and install the mobile counterparts of my desktop and web-based applications – eBay, Facebook, Twitteriffic, Last.fm, WordPress, etc

Of course, the real value of iPhone applications are in areas which truly leverage mobility – eBay as an iPhone app is only marginally more useful than eBay running in Safari on an iPhone.

However, there’s a class of iPhone app emerging that seeks to exploit mobility in ways that were previously difficult to conceive.

Mobile Safari has illustrated that phones can simply be conceptualized as handheld windows into the wider web. What applications such as Mocha VNC and G.ho.st illustrate is that a mobile handset can also be a window into remote computing resources.

Both applications enable users to remotely access a computer’s desktop; Mocha VNC is iPhone-specific and based on the VNC protocol (the virtues of which Samuel Dean covered recently) whereas G.ho.st supports a number of handsets, by dint of its browser-based client. Of course VNC servers can run on Linux, Windows and OS X desktops, bringing a kind of virtualization-lite to the iPhone platform.

I paired my new iPhone with my MacBook Pro’s desktop using Mocha VNC and my domestic WiFi network. The results were surprisingly responsive, with the iPhone rendering a legible, zoom-able, thumbnail of my Mac’s desktop. With some tweaks, Mocha and G.ho.st could enable mobile users to tap the full power of desktop computers from a handheld device…albeit with a cost in battery life, data charges and network latency.

Mocha is currently available as a free app, accompanied by a paid, more fully featured edition. You can learn more about Gh.os.st here and Mocha VNC here.

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  1. Mocha VNC is childs play compared to Jaadu. It’s $25 but well worth the price if you find yourself frequently using VNC. Full keyboard (F-keys, up/down, home, etc), right click, vert/horz scroll, and triple finger hit (looks like you’re doing the the five finger exploding heart technique) to zoom in and out fully.

    I still have no problem managing a dual screen view (24″ & 20″), just takes longer for the initial screen load.

  2. USBLinks | Programmer’s Log Wednesday, October 22, 2008

    [...] Mocha VNC and G.ho.st: Mobile Access to Your Desktop Remote control your desktop with an iPhone. [...]

  3. Remote desktop software Wednesday, May 20, 2009

    Mocha VNC is a pretty cool program. It also works very well due to the iPhone’s VPN secure access support. The only problem is that only the full client has the right-click option and better keyboard support. It’s also limited to just one screen and it can’t handle 1920×1200 screens.

  4. This is a very intriguing software. Being able to view your mac’s desktop through WiFi, on your iPhone is simply brilliant. Good post.

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