Summary:

The Tribune Company is the latest newspaper publisher to give the Associated Press notice that it is considering dropping its services in tw…

The Tribune Company is the latest newspaper publisher to give the Associated Press notice that it is considering dropping its services in two years, E&P reported. In a statement emailed to paidContent, Tribune said it was simply a cost-cutting measure. As for the AP, the company also issued a statement: “We understand that in this climate a lot of newspapers are reexamining their strategies. The Associated Press will continue to work with all members of the cooperative to ensure that we are providing the most efficient, valued and essential news service for them.”

The Tribune’s statement added: “Our newspapers choose from a wide variety of sources for content, including AP. During the next two years, our newspapers will continue to work with AP, but also will consider options to content currently being offered by the news cooperative. This decision has absolutely no immediate impact on our newspapers.” A day before the Tribune’s announcement, I spoke with Lee Abrams, the Tribune’s chief innovation officer, what he thought of offerings of websites like Politico, which is positioning itself as something of a wire service by providing coverage of Washington, DC, as part of its new ad network. He said he didn’t know enough about what Politico was doing to comment specifically. He also said he wasn’t aware as to whether or not the companies are talking. However, he did say that Tribune COO Randy Michaels was going to be looking into deals with other websites and syndicators. More on the recent AP defections after the jump.

This summer, six papers

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