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Summary:

The recent bill dedicated to improving the nation’s broadband profile has passed the Senate — albeit with a few changes to render it less problematic for telecom companies. The modified version of the Broadband Data Improvement Act that is now before President Bush is aimed at […]

The recent bill dedicated to improving the nation’s broadband profile has passed the Senate — albeit with a few changes to render it less problematic for telecom companies. The modified version of the Broadband Data Improvement Act that is now before President Bush is aimed at gathering better data on actual broadband speeds offered to citizens, but is pretty weak when it comes to gathering detailed competition and broadband penetration data.

The final version of the bill eliminates funding for data collection, which means we’re not going to get anything until at least 2010, at which point appropriations might be made, according to an analysis over at Public Knowledge. Additionally, the data collection is supposed to be on a state-by-state basis, which means that comparing apples to apples will be difficult. Just recall how hard it is to get complaint and access line data out of states right now. The carriers are also able to determine exactly how much data they want to disclose about service in various areas.

So what does this legislation do that might help consumers get more information about broadband competition? Well, it does require the General Accounting Office to develop methods and metrics to measure the actual price per bit consumers receive and the actual broadband speeds they experience. These actual speeds can differ widely from advertised speeds, and even based on the type of service a consumer has. We called for such transparency as part of our Broadband Bill of Rights. Now it’s only a matter of waiting and hoping for the money do collect such data. Somewhere, carriers are laughing.

  1. We cant afford it – we just bailed out the banks and AIG. People are soon to be disconnecting cable in favor of food.

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  2. Stacey Higginbotham Tuesday, October 7, 2008

    Alan, it was $40 million. It’s like saving money by refraining from buying a cup of coffee from Starbucks while you choose your new Mercedes. I’m cheap so I might buy into that argument, but the benefits of broadband competition are easily worth $40 million. Although it would be cheaper just to get the carriers to to offer up their own data.

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  3. A complete waste of time and money. This only serves to delay needed rules to open the market to real competition. Instead a do nothing Congress will hand out money to a bunch of lobbying contractors and do, you guessed it, nothing about the problem. The entire Congress needs to be replaced.

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  4. [...] this data and it could be useful in figuring out a real view of broadband competition in the U.S. Congress had to pass a law last year to get this type of data out of [...]

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  5. [...] well as broadband penetration may be above and beyond what Congress had in mind when it passed the Broadband Data Improvement Act, but some of these items, such as noting the actual speeds a user could expect, better reflect the [...]

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  6. [...] are not, however, the only concerns people have over the plan, which is required as part of the Broadband Data Improvement Act (and funded in the stimulus bill). For example some of our commenters have balked at paying that [...]

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  7. [...] Higginbotham | Monday, July 27, 2009 | 3:23 PM PT | 0 comments One of the biggest impediments to accurate broadband mapping is the unwillingness of carriers to share with mapping companies or the governments who employ them [...]

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  8. [...] nationwide broadband map was first called for under the Broadband Data Improvement Act in 2008, but Congress never funded its creation, leaving it essentially stranded. In 2009 with the passage [...]

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