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Summary:

I hate carrying business cards. There, I said it. While so much of my work-time is spent on-line or at various Wi-Fi shops with coffee coffee shops with Wi-Fi, carrying business cards is a necessary evil in our world. Seems like each time I don’t have […]

I hate carrying business cards. There, I said it. While so much of my work-time is spent on-line or at various Wi-Fi shops with coffee coffee shops with Wi-Fi, carrying business cards is a necessary evil in our world. Seems like each time I don’t have any is the time I need to have them, so I don’t leave home with out a half-dozen or so.

Earlier this month at the Mobilize conference, I must have passed out a hundred cards; doing so reduced my weight by about 3 percent because I have the heavy stock card type. Towards the end of the event however, I witnessed “business card nirvana”. Andy Abramson and I were chatting about mobile technologies over drinks when all of sudden he whips out his BlackBerry to send a text message.

Note: we don’t recommend nor condone drinking and texting here at WWD.

Andy asked for my e-mail address as he’s texting something to 41411. Curious, not tipsy, I oblige. Less than a minute later, my iPhone receives an e-mail with all of Andy’s contact information. Even better, there’s an attached vCard containing that info, making it simple to import Andy’s details into my Contacts application. Drop. Dead. Simple.

Dropcard is the solution that Andy used and it’s free for a basic account. Once you sign up and enter your contact information in a virtual business card, you’re set. Using text messaging, all you need to know is someone’s e-mail address and then you simply text 41411 with a command like: “drop kevin@gigaom.com”. The “drop” command tells the Dropcard folks to shoot your contact details to the e-mail address you specify. There’s even a few shortcut commands to speed up the process: you don’t have to type the “gmail.com” bit of an address, for example. Dropcard will assume that no domain in the address means Gmail.

The free account allows you to pass 15 virtual business cards a month, offers two profiles and includes an on-line contact list. $4.99 a month nets you up to 100 Dropcards a month, 20 profiles (for you secret-agent types) and a logo or photo on your Dropcard. Up the ante to $9.99 a month for unlimited Dropcards.

While I’ll still always have a few paper business cards on hand, it’s a safe bet that most people I meet have e-mail addresses. If they have one, I’ll hang on to the physical card and shoot them a Dropcard.

  1. [...] Hat tip: Web Worker Daily. [...]

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  2. [...] Fine Print » Blog Archive » Dropcard wrote an interesting post today onComment on Weighed Down By Business bCards/b? Try Dropcard by Fine b…/bHere’s a quick excerpt[...] Hat tip: Web Worker Daily. [...] [...]

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  3. Nice find! They have a great interface for the iPhone (not an app — just a nice web UI).

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  4. [...] could even eliminate the need for business cards altogether–a very green idea. I read about Dropcard on WebWorkerDaily and immediately saw how I could’ve used [...]

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  5. [...] Dropcard [via Web Worker Daily] [...]

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  6. [...] PawEng » Electronic Business Cards wrote an interesting post today onComment on Weighed Down By Business bCards/b? Try Dropcard by PawEng b…/bHere’s a quick excerpt[...] Dropcard [via Web Worker Daily] [...] [...]

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  7. For the paper cards you do collect, I recommend using evernote (http://evernote.com). This program/website will sync w/ all your computers & phones, and automatically indexes all test, even in picture files! So when I get a card, I take a photo of it and drag the photo into evernote. Then you can search for anything on the card such as the person’s name, company, title, etc. in order to find it! The program has lots of other uses too such as web clipping, recipt storage, to-do lists, etc.

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  8. Doesn’t work in Canada.

    I love the idea, want to use it, but it doesn’t work in Canada…please Dropcard, help your Canuckian brothers and sisters! :)

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  9. I think it would be easier and faster to simply get their phone number and send an SMS quick text (most phones have this) that includes your contact info and/or link to a vcard. Their phone number is probably faster to type than their email address, you don’t have to sign up for anything, and you aren’t sharing your info or theirs with a third party.

    D.

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  10. My phone lets me text any of my contacts details to another number with just a few button presses. I can use ifrared, Bluetooth, text message or email. Of course I have my own details entered so it’s as easy to send those as anyone elses.

    Phone is a Sony Ericsson W810i though I guess it’s a standard feature in their phones these days.

    Now what I was hoping that Dropcard could have been was a service where I could take a photo of a card using my phone, mail it to an address (á la Evernote) and then automatically have it OCRed and sent to my phone in a format where it can automaticaly be imported as a contact.

    There you go someone – free business idea!

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