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Summary:

I know I’m in the minority when I say 80 GB is more than plenty for me in a netbook, so the rest of you should be happy with the news out of Toshiba. They’re sampling a new 256 GB Solid State Disk drive that’s plenty […]

Toshiba256gbssdI know I’m in the minority when I say 80 GB is more than plenty for me in a netbook, so the rest of you should be happy with the news out of Toshiba. They’re sampling a new 256 GB Solid State Disk drive that’s plenty small enough in size, but relatively huge in capacity. The SATA-interface drive takes up the same footprint as a standard 2.5-inch drive, but Toshiba kept the height down to a mere 3 millimeters.Tosh claims we’ll see transfer reads up to 120 MBps and writes at 70 MBps. Mass production starts in the fourth quarter of this year, so I’m sure we’ll see and hear about devices with this drive at CES in January. No price yet, but Toshiba is following the trend by going with the cheaper Multi-Level Cell technology on these bad boys which appear geared towards notebooks but I suspect some netbook modders will be tempted to play with these.

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  1. Actually, the 256GB SSD is for higher end notebooks. Toshiba is introducing 8,16, and 32GB units for netbooks.

  2. I probably read into it too much Brad. I saw the flash module news as well and probably blurred the line for the product target. I’ll update the post / title; thanks!

  3. That drive would be a sweet upgrade for the HP mininote…

  4. SSD… Bleh. I’d hate the thought of having a device for a couple of years or so and then realising that segments of the drive were reaching their wipe limit and thus errors were appearing all over the place. MRAM will be king when they finally figure out how to make the writing head more precise. Check out MRAM on Wiki, the last i read they had 4 MB chips reading and writing at rates close to Level 2 cache speeds on CPU’s. Whats better is that it’s persistant memory and it should be more reliable that current HDDs (similar technology to current HDD’s in the fact it uses opposing magnetic fields to store data but without the downside of moving parts)

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