Summary:

During the press conference today, some more details emerged about the phone, which will be heavily marketed through a partnership between…

During the press conference today, some more details emerged about the phone, which will be heavily marketed through a partnership between T-Mobile and Google (NSDQ: GOOG). T-Mobile’s Chief Development Officer Cole Brodman said: “Marketing will start in October, and it will be the biggest campaign we have ever launched.” As far as features, some of the ones are more obvious. The phone, which has a Qwerty keyboard and a touchscreen, will have a full mobile Web experience that incorporates Google Maps Street View, Gmail, YouTube and other popular Google products. But here’s an extended list of some of the stuff the phone won’t support:

Microsoft (NSDQ: MSFT) Exchange and Office documents: There’s no support yet, but because it’s an open platform, they assume a third-party developer will provide that quickly (could that be Microsoft?). The phone will be able to open Word, Excel and PDFs.

Phone as modem: No, the phone won’t be able to be used as a modem.

Skype: Not at this point in time.

On the browser: It employs a browser that employs the same base as Chrome, called Webkit, which is open source. “You can think of it as Chrome light.”

Likely end-users: They suspect the device will have mass appeal going forward, with something for everyone, but it will be primarily geared towards the consumer, not enterprise.

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