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Earlier in the week, James compared his EV-DO speeds with the hotel WiFi. I tend not to even bother with hotel Internet services unless they’re free. I’m already paying $60 a month for wireless connectivity, so adding another Internet expense isn’t appealing to me unless my […]

SanfranevdoEarlier in the week, James compared his EV-DO speeds with the hotel WiFi. I tend not to even bother with hotel Internet services unless they’re free. I’m already paying $60 a month for wireless connectivity, so adding another Internet expense isn’t appealing to me unless my EV-DO isn’t working. As I slowly get moving this morning, thanks to an exhausting conference yesterday, I just popped my USB 727 into the MSI Wind for a quick test: 1,842 kbps down and 501 kbps up.Those numbers are vastly higher than what James saw; in fact, the wireless broadband is nearly as fast as my home DSL connection, especially on the upside. (We routinely see around 2750 kbps down and 700 kbps up on average at home).So what’s the point of…. well… pointing this out? It’s to illustrate how different that wireless broadband experiences can vary. James and I are in the same hotel, so location-wise, we’re not far. We’re both using Windows devices and while the physical hardware varies, we’re both using EV-DO Rev A modems from Verizon Wireless. It’s a point I can’t emphasize enough: wireless broadband experiences vary wildly on a number of factors. Worth keeping in mind when you hear about the latest WWAN test results: there’s no guarantee that even with the same equipment and location you’ll be able to replicate reported speeds. I still highly recommend a 3G service for connectivity, but after seeing how much variance the service shows, I try keep my expectations realistic.

  1. Are you configuring your TCPIP connection for the WWAN connection to optimize them? I find I get about another 20% pop when I optimize from what my settings are for DSL or Cable.

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