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Summary:

In the run-up to Mobilize, we are working with Dr. Phil Hendrix of IMMR, a small and high-caliber group of academic consultants out of Atlanta, to bring you a poll in which we would love your participation. It’s goal is to get your opinion about the […]

In the run-up to Mobilize, we are working with Dr. Phil Hendrix of IMMR, a small and high-caliber group of academic consultants out of Atlanta, to bring you a poll in which we would love your participation. It’s goal is to get your opinion about the future of “mobile Internet devices” — that growing sector between phones/PDA’s and Laptops. Your opinions could help shape the evolution of the technology. The results from the poll will be presented on GigaOM and at the Mobilize conference. Take the poll by clicking here.

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  1. Share your thoughts on Mobile Internet Devices | MostReviews.com Monday, September 15, 2008

    [...] in time for the Mobilize conference, GigaOM has a brief poll regarding Mobile Internet Devices. Who better to offer up their thoughts than the excellent and well informed jkOTR audience, right? [...]

  2. I think mobile Internet devices implies the wrong thing. It’s just used to connect to the internet.
    I want my mobile device to integrate with my cars systems, music, addresses,hands free phone, gps (send address or created route (google drag and drop) to in car gps), video.
    I want it to integrate with our tv and stereo in house as well.
    I want it to integrate with our security system.
    ….
    In other words I want it to integrate with technology surrounding me, the internet is just a small part of it.

  3. Smartphones came about so that the functions of the PDA and a cell phone could be married together. We also saw PDAs begin to have cell capabilities added in as well. In other words, it’s about convergence.

    MIDs aren’t really changing the game in any way–they’re just making a computer in smaller form factor. They aren’t adding anything new to the mix, and they are making the screen size smaller. To boot, they often come with lesser tech than you find in their full-sized cousins.

    So for me, I don’t really see a future for MIDs.

    I think what people are really looking for is something that gives them a rich browsing/web experience in something the size of a cell phone, or maybe a little larger. And it needs to have a keyboard.

    Woadan

  4. I didn’t say it, so I’ll say it here–it needs to have a decent amount of storage so that all the media the owner enjoys at home can be enjoyed on the device.

    Woadan

  5. MIDs are too expensive and have too small screens.

    If a MID has the screen the size of a credit card, I might just as well surf the internet on my cell phone.
    The sweet spot for MIDs is the large screen but not a computer space.

    The Techcrunch tablet (if it comes out) would sell like crazy.

    Give me a letter sized touchscreen, instant on, decent battery and a price for under $200.
    I would buy 3 as presents to family members.

    Essentially the Amazon Kindle with a color screen, touch and no pre-paid internet connection (I would be fine with Wifi – maybe offer HSDPA/EVDO as an upgrade option).

  6. Vlad (Small Business Blog) Tuesday, September 16, 2008

    Following latest Dvorak’s rant on acronyms in his PC mag column, I just can’t help but think what’s going to happen to all of us if somebody at Washington will figure out the acronym for Windows Mobile Devices…

  7. I agree with most of the previous comment and don’t really see a future to this for a couple of reasons.

    To be successful, a new product has to be groundbreaking or at least bring a significant added-value. It is destined to oblivion if it stands between two markets, which is particularly what UMPCs do (squeezed between smartphones and laptops).

    Sticking with the UMPCs (which are the most common form of MID), what would people use them for? It is too small to perform office tasks (excel, word) and the only real benefit I see here is their Internet connectivity. So ok, good for browsing, blogging, sharing pics, staying in touch with social networks, listening to music, watching videos.
    But for twice as more money, we can get a laptop, and twice as less, an iPhone. Needless to say that these two other devices present more substantial advantages, in terms of performance and portability.

    To me, it is going to end up pretty much like tablet PCs: useful for very specific jobs or activities.

  8. 200 Million Ultramobile Devices in Five Years? Really? – GigaOM Wednesday, September 24, 2008

    [...] I can see how it’s easy to come up with a large number shipped in five years. Marketers, chipmakers, device makers and even bloggers are expanding the category by trying to make the myriad devices do too many things. Intel thinks the ultramobile device will be a computer with VoIP. Dell thinks it will be a computer with a cellular data plan subsidized by carriers. Qualcomm thinks it will be a slightly larger phone. You guys doubt the whole category. [...]

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