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Summary:

So when the first ad featuring Jerry Seinfeld and Bill Gates aired, I was mildly confused and more than anything really wanted to give it a chance. But this evening Microsoft aired the second ad in the series and now I’m really just flat out baffled […]

So when the first ad featuring Jerry Seinfeld and Bill Gates aired, I was mildly confused and more than anything really wanted to give it a chance. But this evening Microsoft aired the second ad in the series and now I’m really just flat out baffled by Microsoft’s decisions with this ad campaign.

This particular ad has a full-length four and half minute version (below), and in keeping with the theme from the first ad, mere 5 seconds of the 270 available are used to mention anything about Microsoft or Windows.

Microsoft, bail out now before you confuse people even more.

By Josh Pigford

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  1. Microsoft. We are so full of money that we don’t care what we waste it on.

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  2. Several random thoughts about this:
    1) I felt sick after watching that
    2) 4m30s of “advertising” is not advertising, its a soap opera
    3) Even if the end says MS is all about “Perpetually Connecting” people, the only message I got was that the clip that billg has absolutely no clue about what consumers want or engaging in understanding them, eventually being evicted from their own consumerbase.
    4) The very last part about Billg doing the robot dance made me cringe, and think back to the Get A Mac advert where one of PC’s mates repeats endlessly, then PC says “Someone please reboot him”
    5) All in all, seems these ads are just a re-affirmation that they’re doing everything wrong, and still think its funny (at the expense of consumers)

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  3. What were you saying before starting with “So when”? And how baffled are you -really, flat-out or just? I know, you’re confused by the advertisement.

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  4. The point of the ad isn’t to sell Vista; the point of the ad is to get people to talk about the ad and pay attention to Microsoft. Hey look! It’s working–we’re doing exactly what they want.

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  5. Ouch. At this point, I think only George Costanza can save this thing. Here’s how it could happen: After airing 30 minutes worth of these scattered, vapid spots, the final one reveals George Costanza to be the creative genius (guru, actually) behind everything. We go back in time to a pitch meeting where George, masquerading as Art Vandelay ad executive, explains to Gates: “No, really, Bill, I can sense the slightest human suffering.” And Jerry responds, “Are you sensing it right now?”

    On another note, am I the only one who feels that the logo and tagline go by too fast when the ads play on TV? If I didn’t know that Microsoft was launching a campaign with Jerry Seinfeld, I might miss it entirely. I think they assume everyone recognizes Bill Gates. Yes, most everyone know his name, but I’m not sure as many could pick him out in a lineup of middle aged men.

    So in the end, it seems like these ads are aimed at geeks who are geek’d about Microsoft and love seeing Bill Gates (even if he makes a fool of himself).

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  6. These ads have a negative feeling to them, only worsening Microsoft’s image. Its one thing to get people talking, but they have to be talking in a positive way for it to do any good.

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  7. What a bizarre ad, I’m not even sure of the point the ad is trying to make. Its good to see a coupe of old people make fools of themselves but really. Find a good ad company and come back with something worthwhile.

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  8. I agree with #4. The ads are doing what they are meant to do, AND, I thought this one was funny (as opposed to the last one). I’m actually looking forward to the next one. Much to my shock, Bill and Jerry are good together. This, from a long-time Mac user. I won’t be switching to Windows, and I’m not sure the ads will do much to stop the bleeding, but they are entertaining.

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  9. Unfortunately, most people really miss what is happening here. This ad series represent nothing more than a very rich boy finally getting his way through his money. Bill loves the Seinfeld series and always wanted to be on the show. Shows gone but that doesn’t mean money can’t buy it back. This is Bill’s way of being on Seinfeld and hoping to promote a dying product. But as many say above, it’s telling the consumer that they, Microsoft, are just as out of touch with the average consumer as the rich are.

    If nothing else, we can thank Bill for stimulating the economy with their $300M campaign.

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