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Summary:

Mobile tech doesn’t get much more vintage than the Apollo Guidance Computers used for NASA moon missions in the 1960’s and 1970’s, right? Well, the AGC won’t compete with today’s GPS systems by any means, but if you want some working nostalgia, John Pultorak provides all […]

Apolloguidancecomputer

Mobile tech doesn’t get much more vintage than the Apollo Guidance Computers used for NASA moon missions in the 1960’s and 1970’s, right? Well, the AGC won’t compete with today’s GPS systems by any means, but if you want some working nostalgia, John Pultorak provides all of the details and plans to build your own. His project took him four years, which is a little bit of overkill for a few day moon trip, no? ;) He promises that if you follow his directions, it will "take you less time, and yours will be better than mine." Sounds like a fun project, but I think I’ll wait for the AGC LEGO Edition. If you’re game, hit the link and be sure to let us know how the project goes. We’ll be here waiting to help if your circuit boards can’t tell which way is up! As I read about the AGC, it actually amazes me how well it worked for such precise navigation all those years ago.

(via Hackszine)

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  1. whats most impressive is that these days your average mobile phone packs more computing power then that thing, and yet there has not been a person on the moon for some 20+ years…

    but i guess thats understandable as the robotics become more and more advanced. just watch the recent mars missions thats working better then expected.

  2. Where am I going to get a Saturn rocket though?

  3. Victor Agreda Jr Tuesday, September 2, 2008

    In college my dad got to dismantle an Apollo capsule as an EE project at NC State. Up until a few years ago we still had a board from it. Good times, great oldies.

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