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Summary:

Several years after it was first expected, Google joins the browser wars today in its own name after participating primarily as the default…

imageSeveral years after it was first expected, Google joins the browser wars today in its own name after participating primarily as the default search engine in Mozilla’s Firefox. Of course, it’s not just a browser — Google Chrome is an open-source combo browser and platform with a Swiss-Army knife set of roles: add to the anti-Microsoft (NSDQ: MSFT) arsenal, give the user yet one more reason to stay in the Google ecosystem, give Google more control over data, etc. It’s also quite possible that it will draw more away from Mozilla’s Firefox than from Microsoft Internet Explorer; both have new versions out with IE8, still in beta, giving users privacy controls that could threaten Google (NSDQ: GOOG). All of this relies on getting real traction. The take from some analysts:

Ben Schachter, UBS: “A GOOG browser will enable improved access to data and user behavior w/out relying on MSFT. As a platform, Chrome may improve GOOG

  1. ben schachter has it right- let's wait & see if they can get it from "beta" to business. why is no one calling for them to give a time line of when they will take it from beta to live and commit to one of these products?

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  2. Chrome will mean different things depending on who/what you are. The one thing it does mean to everyone though is that the Internet is the operating system, and the clouds are moving closer to earh.

    You are Apple;

    This means that if it were not enough of a conflict of interest (Iphone VS Google's Android) to have Google CEO Eric Schmidt sit on your board – It is now. Look for Schmidt to resign sometime in the next six months.

    If you are Microsoft;

    This means that if you ever considered making Internet Explorer open source in the past, now is the time… You can not afford to wait, not even another minute. Expect Microsoft to make Vaporware like noise over the next few months about cloud widgets to give IE closer ties to cloud based initiatives.

    If you are Yahoo;

    you need to buy Mozilla.

    If you are Firefox;

    Keep your friends close, and your enemies closer…yes continue with your Google revenue deal, but learn how to monetize your Browser outside of a paid search deal. Leverage your large user base to form "spin-off" type "power of the crowd" businesses. Note to Firefox, hey you guys ARE a social network…you just haven't figured that out yet.

    If you are Sun;

    Realize that Java is even less relevant every day. First we kicked you out of client side computing because you were a resource hog. Realize that Java will now continue to be less and less relevant on the Server. What a waste of a good company… McNealy must have got hit in the head with one to many hockey pucks.

    If you are a social network;

    "social networks" would follow along with users in the browser. Truth be told, we thought it would be Facebook, or even more likely Firefox that would lead in this initiative. So if you are a social network, you need to know now Chrome is the first step in a series of moves that will make it unnecessary for your peeeps to ever visit your site (directly) again.

    If you are an application developer;

    Life used to be simple, eh? You knew that you should be developing applications for Windows, because that is where the 100's of millions of users were. Fast forward, and now you need to choose what platforms to support, and when. Of course it makes sense to develop for Windows still, but Apple now has a mass of millions of Mac OSx users, and if it a browser based app, write once for Safari, and it should work without much adaptation on the Iphone. There are over a billion cell phones in use world wide, however every phone requires writing to separately (yes even all those different flavors of Java are different phone to phone. Suddenly with Android coming, and a matching desktop browser you need to be here.

    Lastly if you are a consumer;

    There is always a bottleneck somewhere … Think back 5-10 years ago, before what we now refer to broadband… Dial up was painffulllllyy slow, and when you tried to browse, the bottleneck was in your "last mile" connectivity. Once you got broadband, the lag time in reaching a site was likely in your PC (not enough ram, slow processor, etc). Before either of those issues though it was the software that was not "smart" enough to keep up with the ever faster CPU's being created.

    Look for Chrome to optimize all these new "cloud" based application initiatives like Google Gears, etc. This is just another nail in the coffin for desktop based computing. In 10 years, likely 90%+ of your applications will reside somewhere outside of your home or workplace – but certainly not on your desktop.

    http://www.twitter.com/A_F

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  3. OK Emil Exselent

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  4. looking forward to Chrome for efficiency's sake… plus Google tends to roll out really well-tested software, so it shouldn't be half bad in any case

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  5. Since Google owns the internet, it wouldn't be hard for them to promote their own browser. I would give Google Chrome a shot if it weren't for the lack of plugins. Firefox wins all the way for this reason.

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