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Summary:

What a difference a year makes. It was only 10 months ago when the first true netbook, the original Asus Eee PC 701, hit the market. The Eee was a ground-breaking little computer but had a few flaws, the biggest being the limited 800×480 display. Today […]

Asus Eee PC What a difference a year makes. It was only 10 months ago when the first true netbook, the original Asus Eee PC 701, hit the market. The Eee was a ground-breaking little computer but had a few flaws, the biggest being the limited 800×480 display. Today there’s an overwhelming array of low-cost but highly portable and efficient little laptops.

Related Posts: A Quick Guide to Netbooks.10 Ways to trick our your netbook for free.

5 Things to consider before buying a netbook.

7 tools to make your WinXP Netbook Shine.

Each is a full-featured notebook with displays in the 7- to 10-inch range and all are easy to tote around. Nearly all offer several USB ports, a webcam, LED backlit screens, integrated speakers, Wi-Fi and more, so there are very few differentiators. But the many choices in this nascent netbook market can overwhelm, so below is a quick hit list of popular models along with some basic information to help you decide which one might work best for you.

  • Asus Eee PC: The one that started it all has blossomed into over a dozen models, ranging in size and features. You can pick and choose between hard drive-based units or those that offer limited-capacity, Solid State Disk flash modules. Asus offers a simple and effective custom Xandros Linux build, but supports and offers Windows XP as well. Early models use Intel’s Celeron CPU but Asus is transitioning to the newer Intel Atom, which is becoming the de facto netbook standard. Expect to pay between $299 and $599 for a netbook from the Eee PC line.
  • HP Mini-Note: As you can see in our video review, we were very impressed with this 2.8-pounder from HP. Although it’s the one non-Intel netbook available, the VIA C7-M processor handles most tasks fairly well. And while the Mini-Note comes in a single size, it’s not one size fits all: You can configure the hard drive capacity, processor speed, memory and operating system. SUSE Linux, Windows XP and even Windows Vista Business can be had. The HP stands out from the pack with its higher resolution screen; it fits 1280 x 768 pixels into the 8.9-inch screen. Current prices range between $499 and $829.
  • Acer Aspire One: This 2.1-pound netbook approaches more of a sweet spot in terms of pricing: The Linux version is $329, while the XP model is only $20 more. Acer includes a lite build of Linpus Linux, which I found to be great for quick, out-of-the-box computing, but most people would be better served with the XP edition. The incremental extra price also includes twice the memory (1 GB vs. 512 MB) and a faster 120 GB hard drive instead of the slower 8 GB of flash memory. Even at this low price, there’s plenty to like about the Aspire One.
  • MSI Wind: The 2.6-pound Wind from Taiwan is very similar to the higher-end Asus model; in fact, the specifications are nearly the same, as is the price. For $599, you’ll get a 10.2-inch display, Windows XP and a 6-cell battery, which should offer double the run-time over most other netbooks as they use a 3-cell battery. Only this model and the Acer Aspire One offer a full-sized and correctly placed Right-Shift key, something very important to touch-typists. I personally returned my Acer and ordered a Wind partly for this reason, as well as for the fact that the Wind includes integrated Bluetooth for my wireless mouse.

There are other netbooks on the horizon as well. Lenovo has already announced their Ideapad S10 and Dell is expected to enter this market with a small Inspiron model rumored to start at $299. Essentially, these models are very similar to what’s currently available. In fact, there are very few differentiators amongst the crowd. Price is probably the most compelling, followed by the feature set. In my own experience, I’m finding that the Linux implementations are a third factor. While many netbook makers are offering custom Linux builds for simplicity, they have to balance that with the ability for the everyday consumer to add, extend and customize their own experience. Regardless, after using a low-powered computer and just the web for 60 days, I’m convinced that netbooks are well on their way towards becoming personal cloud computers.

Related Research: The Future of Netbooks

  1. Over at last100, I reviewed the re-badged Wind sold in the UK. I’ve jumped on the Netbook bandwagon (MSI Wind U100 / Advent 4211 review) http://www.last100.com/2008/07/14/ive-jumped-on-the-netbook-bandwagon-msi-wind-advent-4211-review/

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  2. As a hardcore mobile ops junkie (2 notebooks in the car, at least one when I travel by plane), the netbooks are a huge attraction for me, but all of them fall short of the standard I need.

    I don’t need large storage capacity or fast processing. I don’t need high resolution graphics, a large screen, or a magnificent keyboard. I don’t need them to be bulletproof, or support any specific OS.

    All I need is tons o’ memory and tons o’ battery life. And in my experience, they all fall short of what I need. At the moment I’m happy with my iMate PDA phone, which is way too tiny to use efficiently but at least it lasts through a flight to Europe or at least cross country. I know that battery technology isn’t making the huge leaps and bounds we’ve been hoping for, but the lack of consistent battery life (coupled with maximum RAM limits) have left me unimpressed by the Netbook market.

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    1. My wifes Acer Aspire one is great. The battery last for 6hrs on a full charge. Look it up. She got it from RadioShack for $350. Good deal.

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  3. Micro Center doesn’t have the “new” Aspire One pricing. XP edition is still 400 with a sale price of 380. Hm. I do like the looks of it, but the crazy positioning of the mouse buttons ruins it for me which is why I’ve got the 10″ Lenovo S10 on order ($395 w/ XP). Unfortunately it only has 512MB builtin and I haven’t seen an optional 6 cell battery yet.

    The Wind still looks like it could be the best 10″ option out there but the ideal config runs $600 – assuming you can find it.

    The Eee line looks plastcy, toy-like. Even the newer models. Not for me.

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  4. 3g might be the differentiator
    http://jkkmobile.blogspot.com/2008/08/meet-lg-x110-netbook-with-3g.html

    Will 3g netbooks be subsidized by operators? Or how do I buy one? SIM card included or do I need to provide my own?

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  5. When I took my first look @ the Acer Aspire One [link] I got excited at its faster-than-eeepc processing power and rumored 3G compatibility to be released later this year.

    Any thoughts on how 3G will affect the netbook/notebook market in general people?

    q./

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    1. Personally I feel that all communications will eventually be in those tiny netboooks. You will be connected to your office at all times (while that netbook is on), and home. You will be able to make and receive office calls, home calls, and cell calls on one device. I see pop ups for customers, family, and friends. I see docking stations at work and home that allow full sized keyboards, and monitors. We really are not that far off from that now!!

      So go Voip if you want, but you will eventually go netbook, cell, whatever they will call it!!

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  6. [...] a Netbook.  Not particularly desirable, if yo ask me – for some of the better ones check out GigaOM’s rundown, ironically also published [...]

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  7. [...] By developing a browser that offers a seamless experience on both mobile and desktop devices, Google can carve out a nice chunk of the browser market for itself. The big opportunity could be especially the emerging class of mobile devices like the Netbooks. [...]

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  8. [...] A Quick Guide to Netbooks Price is probably the most compelling, followed by the feature set. In my own experience, I’m finding that the Linux implementations are a third factor. While many netbook makers are offering custom Linux builds for simplicity, they have to balance that with the ability for the everyday consumer to add, extend and customize their own experience. [...]

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  9. [...] has a short but informative overview of currently available NetBooks.  Which one do I want?  I’m leaning towards the Acer Aspire One, even more attractive after [...]

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  10. One would have to agree with you, Kevin. Netbooks are certainly on there way to being the most likely choice for computer buyers! We are reviewing a vast number of netbooks every week now at http://www.NetbookComputers.com.

    Looking forward to your next article.

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  11. [...] the message is disheartening Ars Technica: Howell verdict: RIAA wins $40,850 P2P judgment Giga Om: A Quick Guide to Netbooks Phil Wainewright: Mashing up the client to the cloud Images: Crowdsourcing for car design (right) [...]

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  12. You have identified the top players and probably the laptops that are actually worth buying. There is a limit to how cheap you can go as the Elonex ONE showed.

    One of the most pioneering netbooks is the GIGABYTE M912. It would be nice to see this sort of innovation rather than multiple Asus Eee PC carbon copies.

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  13. I have an Acer Aspire One – it is really remarkably well made. Performs well. It isn’t the fastest computer around but it is fantastically portable and works great for web, writing, basic office etc. touchpad buttons are not fantastic but actually workable. If I was to really need to do a LOT I’d add a portable folding USB keyboard and a portable USB mouse and STILL be well under a regular laptop. It is FANTASTIC for media playback – the screen is ideal for widescreen video and audio quality is fine especially through headphones. Get the new 6 cell battery and 160Gig hard drive model. And get it in blue – it is very cool. I’d have liked to consider the Wind but it clearly NEEDS the six cell battery and that STILL isn’t available

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    1. Here it is July 09. Do you stillk like your Aspire 1? I found it at Costco and it seems like the best choice for now. Is it relaible and sturdy?

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  14. [...] at Gigaom.com has got some basic information on the different netbooks (including the HP mininote) available for purchase today. He covers the [...]

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  15. [...] already identified a few aspects that cause people to pick one netbook over another: price is a definite factor as are the Linux implementations that some vendors customize and [...]

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  16. [...] What a difference a year makes! Here is a quick overview of the latest and greatest Netbooks. [...]

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  17. My take is the Eee PC 901. Light, Flash drive, and good battery.

    The difficult choice is Linux or Windows XP? Let your heart or your brain decide?

    http://tech-talk.biz/2008/09/08/eee-pc-linux-or-xp/

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  18. [...] than the foray into the impetuous development of netbooks, or nettops (Om Malik coins it the personal cloud computer) by companies such as HP, Lenovo, Fujitsu and [...]

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  19. I have compiled a list of some popular netbooks, You may find it useful:

    http://snsays.com/606/netbooks/

    BTW, I personally own a EEE PC :)

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  20. [...] and mobile Internet devices. The report says today there are about 10 million such devices, about 90 percent of which are netbooks. But to say that in five years the tiny web-enabled PCs will reach the same size as today’s [...]

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  21. [...] Vijay Rakesh thinks there could be a slowdown on the horizon as sales of the smaller, ultraportable netbooks have started to gain some speed and steal some market share from laptops. In a report, he trimmed [...]

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  22. [...] those who sign up for their 2-year wireless Internet service. It has teamed up with Intel, Acer, Asus, HCL and Lenovo in order to make this [...]

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  23. [...] those who sign up for its two-year wireless Internet service. It has teamed up with Intel, Acer, Asus, HCL and Lenovo in order to make this [...]

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  24. [...] XO 1.0 was a revolution when it was first launched in 2007; in a market where netbooks hadn’t even been invented, Nicholas Negroponte and one laptop per child helped push a product out [...]

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  25. I really like the Dell Mini 9″ and the HP 2133 (solid design but with a VIA processor).. Have you seen the new Dell Mini 12″? Perhaps not a netbook but a really small laptop..

    Pictures and much more of the Dell Mini 9″ is available at http://www.dell-mini.com

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  26. [...] Nokia Announces N97 Superphone, Won’t Sell It for MonthsBitTorrent at War With VoIP? HardlyA Quick Guide to NetbooksSocial Web’s Big Question: Federate or Aggregate?The Magic behind MagicJackYahoo! 2008 Year in [...]

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  27. [...] trackbacks so far December 5th, 2008 6:27 PM PT A Quick Guide to Netbooks – GigaOM said: [...] 5 Things to consider before buying a netbook. [...] December 5th, 2008 6:32 PM [...]

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  28. [...] The Internet Is Better Than SexCBS Interactive Cuts Jobs: CNET, Last.fm ImpactedA Quick Guide to NetbooksGoogle Chrome, Out of Beta. Will That Be Enough?The Magic behind MagicJack5 Things to Consider [...]

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  29. [...] Posts: A Quick Guide to Netbooks.10 Ways to trickout your netbook for [...]

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  30. [...] Posts: A Quick Guide to Netbooks.10 Ways to trick our your netbook for free.5 Things to consider before buying a [...]

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  31. [...] alas, if only i owned a cheapo netbook, tablet, or an ultra-mobile pc.  something that would allow me write up a few blog posts or [...]

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  32. [...] is emerging as an early leader in netbooks, but HP, Lenovo, Dell and possibly Apple are competing as well. Who will lead in netbook apps? It’s up for grabs. [...]

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  33. [...] Eaton | Thursday, January 1, 2009 | 9:00 PM PT | 0 comments 2008 was the year of the netbook: My local electronics store went from having none in stock to a display offering some 20 types. [...]

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  34. [...] technology, especially on the Internet, is likely to continue to evolve rapidly. Mobile devices and netbooks could invite people to spend more of their time online, expanding a captive audience for [...]

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  35. [...] technology, especially on the Internet, is likely to continue to evolve rapidly. Mobile devices and netbooks could invite people to spend more of their time online, expanding a captive audience for [...]

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  36. [...] something funny happened while I was waiting around for someone to donate me an old junker.  Netbooks became all the range.  If I were a frequent business traveler, there’s no question I would own one of these 7 [...]

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  37. [...] those of you unfamiliar with netbooks, they are: Light-weight, low-cost, energy-efficient, highly portable laptops that achieve these [...]

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  38. I also like Dell Mini 9″. I like using netbook. very nice and exciting enjoy this valuable technology.

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  39. I would say that the “one laptop per child” laptop was the first netbook that came out. The ee-pc would be the second netbook.

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  40. [...] Full article [...]

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  41. well, I was skeptical about these netbooks, but I ended up buying a very slick netbook at http://www.slicknetbooks.com I love it! and the price was unbelievable!

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  42. [...] Netbook, varian yang lebih kecil dari Notebook.  Pelopor pertama adalah Asus dengan meluncurkan Asus Eee PC 700, dan sekarang perusahaan laptop lainnya seperti Acer dan MSI juga merilis Netbook (Acer Aspire Satu dan MSI).  Netbook memiliki: [...]

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  43. I am with A.B. Dada,

    Netbooks rea great, but what we need is to have a small netbook with massive memory and an awesome battery life. memory I am thinking 160Gb and bettery life of atleast 5 hrs.

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  44. [...] more information about Netbooks, check out this informative piece by GigaOM’s Kevin [...]

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  45. make them 10lbs or even 12lbs because no one would care.
    if its got a battery life of over 8+hrs of use and huge amount 3gigs+ of ram to back its slow cpu
    i still have a old itronix ultra toughbook and its a beast but the battery life and the ram is why i bought it

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  46. “I’m finding that the Linux implementations are a third factor. While many netbook makers are offering custom Linux builds for simplicity, they have to balance that with the ability for the everyday consumer to add, extend and customize their own experience”

    The ability to extend, customize and add to linux based machines is far greater than any windows box. For instance, lets just look at the verizon usb727 broadband modem. With windows you must install a driver and special software to use the device while the linux based machine is pure plug&play. The modem works right out of the box. There is no need for anti virus software as well which hogs resources on any windows box. Customize to your hearts content with linux. Everything you can do on windows and more. Reviewers must stop discounting the usability of linux. Everyone I have converted to linux from windows has rediscovered the power of their computers and loving it!

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  47. thanks for the suggestion about buying discount netbooks at http://www.slicknetbooks.com Just bought a great one today.

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  48. I like the HP mini-notebook because this brand is extremely reliable. I have a HP desktop computer from 7 years ago and it is still lightning fast. It might be a little more expensive, but it’s worth it.

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  49. +1 for MSI Wind!!!!!!

    Mine is currently booting 4 operating systems. I love it!

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  50. For me, the OS is the decisive factor I consider when looking for one of these.

    My needs:
    To use wi-fi to get on the web at my local coffee shop, read email, use Skype to talk with my relatives in Europe, play simple games to kill a few hours while on the plane.

    Netbook facts:
    1) Limited hardware resources – processor isn’t any speed daemon, there aren’t globs of memory to waste on useless tasks.
    2) Machine is exposed to the internet at coffee shops, at airports, in foreign countries, etc., etc. Most places probably use some kind of a hardware firewall, some will not. Bottom line, security is in my own hands.

    Reasoning:
    I want something simple and lightweight that will do the tasks at reasonable speed, use the limited hardware efficiently and be somewhat reasonably secure.

    Conclusion:
    I would not even consider running a netbook with any version of any MS Windows due to its inherently inefficient and insecure nature.

    1) I don’t feel like spending the extra money for the extra hardware to make Windows run at half decent speed. On the other hand, I can strip down Linux to the bare necessities to make it run faster on that same limited hardware.

    2) Call me a chicken but I am just too afraid to go online via Windows (there is no such thing as too much paranoia). I do run XP at home on one of my computers and it is the most secure machine I have. It is not connected to any network.

    Bottom line:
    To browse the web, read mail, Skype around, etc., it will be some form of a Linux, BSD or Solaris machine.
    To run MS Office or any other Windows-only software, the Windows box will be loaded with extra hardware and physically disconnected from any network.

    Any word on Mac netbooks?

    Jiri

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    1. You are very right. The software you choose is very important. exbi chao.

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  51. [...] How Apple Put Everyone In an App State of MindWhy eBay Should Accept Skype Founders’ Buyout OfferA Quick Guide to NetbooksCountdown to 4G: Who’s Doing What, When6 Half-Truths About the Cloud The Twilight Problem: Why [...]

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  52. marc erenstein Wednesday, April 15, 2009

    just bought a great netbook for my wife at a great low price here: http://www.slicknetbooks.com

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  53. Isn’t there a way to flag the shameless comment spam from the slicknotebooks.com shills?

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    1. There should be a plugin available for WordPress to enable such reporting facilities.

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  54. [...] verdad que hace apenas un par de días que hemos sacado aquí un netbook, pero es inevitable: es el gadget de moda y todo el mundo quiere subirse al carro, y llevarse un buen trozo de ese sabroso pastel de 21 [...]

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  55. [...] Our own Gina Trapani compiled the pros and cons of popular models at her Smarterware site. GigaOM details the brand differences, and NotebookReview.com has a seriously comprehensive guide for anyone who’s obsessing over, [...]

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  56. [...] Our own Gina Trapani compiled the pros and cons of popular models at her Smarterware site. GigaOM details the brand differences, and NotebookReview.com has a seriously comprehensive guide for anyone who’s obsessing over, [...]

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  57. [...] Our own Gina Trapani compiled the pros and cons of popular models at her Smarterware site. GigaOM details the brand differences, and NotebookReview.com has a seriously comprehensive guide for anyone who’s obsessing over, [...]

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  58. [...] Our own Gina Trapani compiled the pros and cons of popular models at her Smarterware site. GigaOM details the brand differences, and NotebookReview.com has a seriously comprehensive guide for anyone who’s obsessing over, [...]

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  59. [...] possess Gina Trapani compiled the pros and cons of favourite models at her Smarterware site. GigaOM details the sort differences, and NotebookReview.com has a seriously broad guide for anyone who’s obsessing over, say, the [...]

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  60. [...] Our own Gina Trapani compiled the pros and cons of popular models at her Smarterware site. GigaOM details the brand differences, and NotebookReview.com has a seriously comprehensive guide for anyone who’s obsessing over, [...]

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  61. [...] Our own Gina Trapani compiled the pros and cons of popular models at her Smarterware site. GigaOM details the brand differences, and NotebookReview.com has a seriously comprehensive guide for anyone who’s obsessing over, [...]

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  62. [...] Our own Gina Trapani compiled the pros and cons of popular models at her Smarterware site. GigaOM details the brand differences, and NotebookReview.com has a seriously comprehensive guide for anyone who’s obsessing over, [...]

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  63. [...] Briefly, I interpret mobile computing to include the use of smaller computing devices such as net books and mobile phones in a wireless environment. We are currently in the process of trialling the small [...]

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  64. [...] Our own Gina Trapani compiled the pros and cons of popular models at her Smarterware site. GigaOM details the brand differences, and NotebookReview.com has a seriously comprehensive guide for anyone who’s obsessing over, [...]

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  65. [...] We need a generation that looks for beauty in grasslands and mountains, not just on LCD screens and netbooks. [...]

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  66. [...] We need a generation that looks for beauty in grasslands and mountains, not just on LCD screens and netbooks. [...]

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  67. I’m a college student and I’m looking at geting a Net book. Which one should I get? jut wondering if anyone could help…

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  68. “I’m a college student and I’m looking at geting a Net book. Which one should I get? jut wondering if anyone could help…”

    In my opinion best netbook for a student is HP 2133 netbook

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  69. I just bought ASUS Eee PC 1000HE 10-Inch Netbook, and I am loving it.

    I learned so much while trying to research the market, I even wrote an article about it:
    How to Buy a Netbook and Get the Best Deal

    Pretty soon netbooks will overtake the market.

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  70. [...] A Quick Guide to Netbooks [...]

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  71. [...] A Quick Guide to Netbooks: In this guide, you’ll get an overview of netbooks and learn how to choose one. [...]

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  72. [...] new product is a rare bright spot. But that’s exactly what’s happened in the case of netbooks, those small, light and relatively inexpensive notebook computers. Intel benefits greatly from this market, as its Atom line of CPUs powers roughly 90 percent of the [...]

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  73. [...] it’s home entertainment, electronic gaming, in-vehicle technology, or emerging categories such as Netbooks, Blu-Ray DVD Players and Soundbars; CEA’s methodology produces second-to-none accuracy. All of [...]

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  74. I think that netbooks are a great idea! Just as a cautionary voice, do NOT expect to be buying a laptop. It’s more of a laptop-shaped blackberry! Hope this helps!

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  75. I have receive today my NetColors 10-N270 with 10.2 screen from
    http://netbookdirect.net the direct store of the manufacturer.

    This is the powerfullest machine out there and they offer an external CD-R slim bay witch is very useful to install and backup, they offer to a DVD-R but I did not pick it, I have mine with Intel Atom N270 2GB Ram, 250GB HDD, integrated Bluetooth 2.1, they will have the 10-N270-3G with integrated 3G/HSDPA fully uncap (you can use it with any carrier). Meanwhile I am using the Bluetooth 2.1 to connect to Internet via my mobile.

    The keyboard is pretty comfortable. They do not obligate you to buy the XP license as other brands witch is good as at least I do not have to take time to uninstall. I totally agree with you Jiri(PS. I never have try a Mac netbook, one friend will buy one next week, once he get it I will post here my review for you)

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  76. Laura Ridgeway Thursday, June 4, 2009

    so are they good computers. Iam going into high school and want to know if they are useful. I mean i know that they dont have a very big memory but that is what flash drives are for. So, is internet fast?

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  77. Marcus,

    You might like to try looking at this: http://www.mini-laptops-and-notebooks.com/top-ten-mini-laptops.html

    Don’t restrict yourself with an HP 2133 – there are better models such as the new Samsung NC310.

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  78. I’ve been watching the netbook market for a while now. I finally got a really good deal on an ASUS EeePC 1000HE at http://tiny.cc/1TZsO. Aside from the small size and light weight, the biggest deal is the battery. I can go 8+ hours on a single charge, which really transforms the usability.

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    1. Really nice choice Abner. Especially its battery life is very good for people who will use netbooks away from home uses.

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    2. You’re right Abner, the 1000HE is excellent.

      Unbelievably, Asus has now bettered themselves with the 1005HA – it’s got a 10.5 hour battery life (we know in most cases it won’t last that long, but it’ll run for a fair bit longer than most!) and clamshell design. It’s Atom 280 based, with the usual memory / hard disk specs. Can get it at Amazon for similar price as 1000HE (link here).

      I’ve recommended it to the readers on my blog because there’s nothing more frustrating than having the battery die on a long journey. Hopefully this will make it a thing of the past!

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  79. [...] interesting article on touch devices in the New York Times: 2008 was the year of the netbook: My local electronics store went from having none in stock to a display offering some 20 types. [...]

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  80. [...] a huge surge of interest. So I htought it might be worth providing some netbooks links. Here is GigaOm talking Netbooks.  yes the article is a year and a half old but it’s a starting point Giga Eyes Wide [...]

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  81. [...] videos in beautiful, high-definition color. For a few hundred bucks you can buy a pocket-sized netbook incalculably more powerful than the room-sized, air-conditioned behemoth that helped send Apollo 11 [...]

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  82. I just finished a new product for netbooks called the NetBook Riser. It raises your netbook for better viewing and reduces heat.

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  83. I’ve searched high and low for the best selection of netbooks and I finally found http://www.slicknetbooks.com Amazing selection and at great prices.

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  84. [...] A quick guide to Netbooks can be read here [...]

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  85. The ability to extend, customize and add to linux based machines is far greater than any windows box. For instance, lets just look at the verizon usb727 broadband modem. With windows you must install a driver and special software to use the device while the linux based machine is pure plug&play. The modem works right out of the box. There is no need for anti virus software as well which hogs resources on any windows box.

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  86. I don’t feel like spending the extra money for the extra hardware to make Windows run at half decent speed. On the other hand, I can strip down Linux to the bare necessities to make it run faster on that same limited hardware.

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  87. Netbooks are a late arrival and are really behind the times, look at what I have been using for years now. A Sony Vaio PCG-U101. It was good on performance when I bought it; however, with all these netbooks can’t do much better when it comes to screen resolution, my smaller display had 1024×768. Now, I would like a netbook with a display of at least 1280×1024, but what is the best that they offer 1600 x 768, ug. A wider screen but I also want a bigger picture up/down. A Vaio P has an 8″ screen, my screen is 7.1″. So, now you all know what the draw back is about these netbooks.

    BTW, my U101 is dual bootable Windoze XP/Slackware, and Slackware is not scaled down.

    So, when will the rest of the world realize that they want a higher resolution? Lets see its taken about 7 years for sub notebooks to catch on, even though they are not quite as small, hmm.

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  88. Seems the post is bit outdated, in fact i needed some help to choose a netbook, I have a big enough dell dual boot[vista/ubuntu], but now I need an extra piece of hardware to run windows as I plan to convert my dual boot to ubuntu only for work , but unfortunately my necessary tools like google talk, some other voip software don’t work in it. I am looking for something with a decent webcam, also at a cheap prize, without compromising much on the quality.

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  89. Eventually I’ll get one of these things but for now I’m waiting for some friends who are getting Netbooks from Acer, Asus and HP and I’ll get to try them first!

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  90. [...] A quick guide to netbooks (2008) [...]

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  91. hi there what i like about the eee pc eee keyboard hp netbooks dell netbooks is that you can buy them with solid state flash drives not hard drive lets see hp 311 has a optional 80 gb ssd the 2111 netbook from hp can opt for a 128 gb ssd the eee keyboard has a 16 gb ssd or opt for 32 gb ssd but ssd standard about 50% of eee pc have ssd standard the alien ware 11 have a 256 gb ssd optional dell has a dell 10 series with a 32 gb ssd with xp or 16 gb ssd with linux

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  92. Does anyone know if you can hook up a Netbook “Emachine” to a data projector?

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  93. There really are some great netbooks out there and choosing the right one is quite tricky, but you’ve pretty much hit the nail on the head with this one. My personal favorite is the dell mini 10.

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