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Summary:

The Deal, the industry paper covering the deals, including M&A and VC, and owned by the Wasserstein & Co., is reducing its weekly print freq…

The Deal, the industry paper covering the deals, including M&A and VC, and owned by the Wasserstein & Co., is reducing its weekly print frequency to a bi-weekly, beginning in January. Its circulation will remain at 50,000, reports BtoBOnline. The decline comes as its bread and butter advertising sector of financial services sector is going through a horrendous downturn, but Kevin Worth, CEO of The Deal says that the company started thinking about it 18 months ago, much before the current state of affairs.

Also, it is initiating some changes on its online side: a big portion of the site, until now behind a subscription wall, will go free. It is also combining some of its online subscriptions products into one, called The Deal Pipeline, currently in beta testing. In keeping with this, the company wants to flip its revenue split, which for now 60 percent of its revenue from advertising (including print, events and online) and 40 percent from subscriptions…the goal is to flip that ratio by 2010, Worth said.

By Rafat Ali

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  1. It bobble-heads my mind that you don't make the correlation between the story you just ran yesterday and taking online publications like The Deal from paid to free. I quote from "More Major Mag Nets Sour on Remnant Ad Nets":

    "So what’s the problem with those formats? Spanfeller: 'Basic free market theory suggests that this will be a run to the bottom. Each turn of the wheel will net lower and lower gross costs to the network and net costs to the publisher.'"

    I repeat, lower net costs to the publisher. The newspaper industry is in a tailspin and you guys don't offer one comment that maybe ditching bread and butter subscriptions is a bad thing. That maybe punch the monkey advertising won't pay the bills in the long run. That maybe keeping the paid wall up and letting people choose to "earn" a Site Pass for free entrance would be a good alternative.

    It isn't all or nothing, fee or free, there is a bridge. This is a huge industry in tremendous pain and you could be part of the solution Rafat.

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