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Summary:

When San Francisco-based Kwiry, “think query,” launched a reminder service in December, it didn’t seem that helpful. It let people remember…

imageWhen San Francisco-based Kwiry, “think query,” launched a reminder service in December, it didn’t seem that helpful. It let people remember things by sending a text message to their Kwiry box at 59479 (kwiry), while also sending themselves an e-mail. A typical message might read: “Remember to take out the trash.” The idea was simple, but it seemed to lack much depth because most people could send themselves messages from their own phone anyway. Well, today it got more useful. Kwiry announced that it now supports Netflix (NSDQ: NFLX) and Amazon — meaning you can text a movie you want to watch directly to your queue, or add a book or other item directly to your Wish List on Amazon (NSDQ: AMZN). I tried this myself by sending two movie titles to Netflix, The Dark Knight, which I knew wasn’t out yet, and the cult classic The Breakfast Club. The service took a few minutes to work, but sure enough both appeared in my Queue, with The Dark Knight, listed under availability unknown. Adding direct channels into Web services seems a lot more useful than simply sending a reminder to your email box. Here’s another reminder: The company raised $1 million in funding from Hummer Winblad Venture in March 2007.

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  1. Cool for users but how do they make money? Any competitors and why don't the mobile providers or calendar makers do this (or are they so slow moving & innovation-less they have to buy little stuff like this?)

  2. Hi Digital Bear, Making money is often times one of the last things a company tries to do these days…Build a community, get the audience, and then figure it out seems to be the mantra. Kwiry reminds me of a company named Jott Networks, which lets you dial up a phone number, leave yourself a reminder, and then transcribes it so it ends up being text in your Jott account. It also integrates into things like Twitter, and Google calendar. It pegs its future revenues on premium services and advertising. Hope that helps, Tricia

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