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Summary:

Forget HD. In its perpetual quest to provide bigger and better entertainment (and to sell new gear), the consumer electronics industry is pushing 3D televisions. But first it needs to figure how to deliver the 3D tech and what types of standards need to be set […]

Forget HD. In its perpetual quest to provide bigger and better entertainment (and to sell new gear), the consumer electronics industry is pushing 3D televisions. But first it needs to figure how to deliver the 3D tech and what types of standards need to be set so the experience is the same as that of 3D movies. The Entertainment Technology Center at the University of Southern California said it has formed a 3D working group to solve some of these issues, and plans to make an announcement regarding the group in the coming days.

The effort, chaired by a representative from Dolby Labs, will also involve the major movie studios and consumer device makers. A spokeswoman for the ETC said each year the center focuses on a new technology, and this year that focus will be 3D for televisions. “3D is going to become more and more pervasive and we need to know how to carry it all the way from the theater into your home and what products will be best for the consumer in the end,” she said.

We’re eager to learn more, and 3D is certainly on the minds of movie makers. Last month, the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers formed a 3D task force to address the appropriate standards to deliver 3D content to the home via cable, DVDs, the web and other formats. My guess is if we think HD content requires a lot of data, 3D is going to blow our bandwidth caps out of the water.

Hat Tip to EEtimes

photo courtesy of nickstone333 via Flickr

By Stacey Higginbotham

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  1. Varun Mahajan Thursday, August 7, 2008

    I am a bit confused that how will we watch 3D TV ..Will we need an oracle( as in magic, not as in dbms)?

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  2. Jesse Kopelman Thursday, August 7, 2008

    You might be surprised by how relatively little bandwidth 3D technology actually takes. Current techniques seem to rely on a form of visual matrix stereo that probably requires no more data than 2D content of the same resolution. In many ways this is equivalent to interlacing, where each frame only gets half the data. A truer 3D technology would involve holography, which actually allows for some neat data compression tricks.

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  3. Stacey Higginbotham Thursday, August 7, 2008

    Samsung and Philips are both attempting to do it without glasses using different angles of the same object to make it appear 3D. I’ve seen some efforts at this, and it mostly looks blurry.

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  4. 3D takes between 1x and 2x of the equivalent of the 2D presentation. Depends on format, quality of 2D fallback image, and quality of 3D image.

    In an ironic twist, a person from DTS is the chair of the SMPTE 3D task force.

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  5. more convenient with out the glasses

    rc

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  6. WE NOW WILL HAVE 3D HD TELEVISION FOR TECHNOLOGY BUT NOT TO LONG IN THE FUTURE WILL WE EXPERIENCE A NEW TYPE OF HD TELEVISION TECHNOLOGY OF TASTE – SMELL AND TOUCH

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  7. [...] Bringing 3D TV to the home – 08/07/08 In its perpetual quest to provide bigger and better entertainment (and to sell new gear), the consumer electronics industry is pushing 3D televisions. But first it needs to figure how to deliver the 3D tech and what types of standards need to be set so the experience is the same as that of 3D movies. via GigaOM [...]

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  8. [...] on the University of Southern California’s Entertainment Technology Center testbed for emerging 3-D television technologies got me thinking about how real 3-D really [...]

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  9. There are already 3d tv displays available for advertising purposes used on trading shows etc. It will only take some time for content companies to produce 3d content on a large scale to bring in 3d television to the home. By that time the delivery will not be a problem anymore since the use of glass cable will be more widely spread. 3d television is not that far away anymore.

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  10. [...] make the final argument, which basically boils down to this — this is a transparent effort to make you buy more gadgets with little return so far. Dreamworks has committed to making all of their content in 3-D going [...]

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