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Summary:

The popularity of Twitter has launched a bevy of other services that depend on small updates and social interaction. One that isn’t just a copycat is mixin, which applies a Twitter feel to personal agendas – I think of it as “microscheduling.” After you create an […]

ScreenshotThe popularity of Twitter has launched a bevy of other services that depend on small updates and social interaction. One that isn’t just a copycat is mixin, which applies a Twitter feel to personal agendas – I think of it as “microscheduling.” After you create an account (or login with OpenID), Mixin lets you post what you’re doing, or planning on doing, on any day from now forward, with time slots of “morning”, “lunch”, “afternoon”, “evening”, and “night”. Then comes the social part: you can share your agendas or events with friends, and see multiple timelines together, in hopes of finding common ground.

There’s plenty more here: the mixin folks have done a good job of building bridges. You can send in updates via Email, IM, SMS, Twitter, or calendar; you can get out RSS, ICS, or FOAF data, among other things. You can even publish your mixin timeline to your blog or emails. Mixin events have discussion pages, with embedded photos and maps and videos. They even have their own RESTful API. The main question: will microscheduling get the same traction that microblogging her?

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  1. frederic sidler Monday, August 4, 2008

    Internally we are comparing instant messaging (jabber, MSN, etc.) with instant calendaring (mixin), but microscheduling is also an interesting definition.

    In both definition (instantcalendaring, microscheduling), our idea is to let friends publish what they would like to do in the near future. This way you have the opportunity to do use virtual informations to do real things together.

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