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Summary:

Gone are the days when the cell phone is simply for talking. In a survey commissioned by Access Systems Americas and conducted by Amplitude Research, buyers of new cell phones look at video capability (33%), music (34%), accessing the Internet (61%), email capabilities (63%), camera (67%), […]

Gone are the days when the cell phone is simply for talking.

In a survey commissioned by Access Systems Americas and conducted by Amplitude Research, buyers of new cell phones look at video capability (33%), music (34%), accessing the Internet (61%), email capabilities (63%), camera (67%), and text messaging (73%) as the most important features that they look for.

Other notable findings of the survey are:

  • 62 percent said they would use Bluetooth while 51 percent will use the hands-free microphone to comply with restrictions when driving
  • 39 percent said they have added new applications to their cell phones.
  • 41 percent said they send or check emails one to five times a day while 28 percent said they do not use their cell phones for email
  • 40 percent said they use their cell phones for traffic, weather, and stock market alerts
  • 30 percent said they use their cell phones for banking transactions

What is important though is that 88 percent said that it is very important to have a cell phone to use in case of emergency.

I have to admit that I am not too familiar with my cell phone’s functions. I use it simply to call and send text messages. Of course, this was until yesterday when I received a note from T-Mobile informing me that text messaging rate will increase from $0.15 cents to $0.20 cents effective August 29, 2008.

What features of your cell phone are most important for you?

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  1. The cost of the plan is the most important, and understanding the limitations of it. It’s also useful to have a phone with known hacks that let you get out of using the carrier’s Internet service and using something else. I make sure to have the unlimited texting plan – my 2 teenage daughters send more texts a day than I do in a month.

  2. Yair Silbermintz Wednesday, July 2, 2008

    I recently had some fun when getting my company to order a new phone. So very hard explaining that I want three features and three features only:

    Calling (very important)
    Bluetooth (its hard to troubleshoot computers while holding a phone in one hand)
    Texting (boss insisted)

    Keeping all the features I’ll never use out means that my phone lasts an average of 4 days on one charge.

  3. Marcin Grodzicki Thursday, July 3, 2008

    I also like to have a full keyboard for faster web and calendaring usage. It all makes no difference if you can’t make a call or it drops in the middle of the sentence. Which happens a lot, but it’s not the phone’s but rather the network issue anyway…

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