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Summary:

Anyone who thought that HP was targeting the Mini-Note computer to the education market just for show might want to check in with Fresno United School District. The California educational group is deploying 7,000 of the smallish notebooks in grades K-12. Teachers like the size and […]

HpmininoteAnyone who thought that HP was targeting the Mini-Note computer to the education market just for show might want to check in with Fresno United School District. The California educational group is deploying 7,000 of the smallish notebooks in grades K-12. Teachers like the size and connectivity for students; presumably the district has WiFi functionality based on this quote from the district’s CTO:

“The HP Mini-Note is a powerful laptop that is small enough to fit onstudents’ desks along with their textbooks and papers, allowing themaccess to the Internet and educational content from around the worldwithout leaving their seats,”

As much as James liked the Mini-Note (and for good reason), I do see the device appealing more to the educational sector. Most mainstream consumesr still want a traditional, Windows-based device that has more processing power than they likely need in a small notebook. When folks spec out a Mini-Note in that fashion, they’ll find more choices in their price range as they discount the size and weight factors. Don’t misunderstand me: it’s a nice machine and regular readers here likely recognize the value of a small form-factor. By and large however, I think HP will sell 3x to 5x more Mini-Notes to the education market than to consumers. Maybe we’ll revisit this with some hard numbers by year end.

  1. Kevin you are absolutely wrong. I work for HP Presales product information.

    I kid you not, there has NEVER been the level of interest in an HP notebook line than the Mini-Note has generated.

    And this product is sold through our business line. Consumers dont even know where to find it and they are jumping all over this thing.

    The vast majority of caller are in fact consumers not businesses. This trend is huge my friend, not just in the education market. home users are eating this thing up.

    I envision multiple family members toting these kinds of devices around.

    Think about it dude the exact same appeal that this computer has to the education market, it had to parents, as a computer for kids. Small light weight, these look like they are built for kids.

    You say they are underpowered. But these are not meant to be heavy lifting computing devices.
    You have a big “family” PC and personal mini notebooks for family members.

    For anybody who currently uses a desktop, but wants to get the internet, email, ect, on vacation and wants more than a 3 inch phone screen this is ideal.

    Size does matter.
    Who needs to lug around a 15.4 inch screen and six pounds just to browse the net in your hotel room. Consumers who arent really working when on the road just need mobile connectivity, not power.

    Given the choice of less power at a third the weight, many people will take the light weight.

    This is not speculation, I talk to people all the time who love this concept, and want to know how they can get one.

    when people call us the first question we ask is, “Are you interested in a home or business product”. We get “home” the vast majority of the time, before someone asks about the Mini-Note. It aint even on our consumer web-site.

    They are finding it anyway and buying it in droves.

    The only thing that HP did wrong is not bother to market it directly to consumers in the first place.

    I guaranty you that we are missing a ton of sales by not even offering it on the HP Home and Home Office site.

    Share
  2. Kevin you are absolutely wrong. I work for HP Presales product information.

    I kid you not, there has NEVER been the level of interest in an HP notebook line than the Mini-Note has generated.

    And this product is sold through our business line. Consumers dont even know where to find it and they are jumping all over this thing.

    The vast majority of caller are in fact consumers not businesses. This trend is huge my friend, not just in the education market. home users are eating this thing up.

    I envision multiple family members toting these kinds of devices around.

    Think about it dude the exact same appeal that this computer has to the education market, it had to parents, as a computer for kids. Small light weight, these look like they are built for kids.

    You say they are underpowered. But these are not meant to be heavy lifting computing devices.
    You have a big “family” PC and personal mini notebooks for family members.

    For anybody who currently uses a desktop, but wants to get the internet, email, ect, on vacation and wants more than a 3 inch phone screen this is ideal.

    Size does matter.
    Who needs to lug around a 15.4 inch screen and six pounds just to browse the net in your hotel room. Consumers who arent really working when on the road just need mobile connectivity, not power.

    Given the choice of less power at a third the weight, many people will take the light weight.

    This is not speculation, I talk to people all the time who love this concept, and want to know how they can get one.

    when people call us the first question we ask is, “Are you interested in a home or business product”. We get “home” the vast majority of the time, before someone asks about the Mini-Note. It aint even on our consumer web-site.

    They are finding it anyway and buying it in droves.

    The only thing that HP did wrong is not bother to market it directly to consumers in the first place.

    I guaranty you that we are missing a ton of sales by not even offering it on the HP Home and Home Office site.

    Share

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