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Summary:

Get your satire meters cranked up: AT&T has come up with an advertising effort designed to shame you into paying your bills online (thanks, Consumerist). The telecommunications company that got into hot water with warrantless wiretapping is pushing its online bill payments with a series of […]

Get your satire meters cranked up: AT&T has come up with an advertising effort designed to shame you into paying your bills online (thanks, Consumerist). The telecommunications company that got into hot water with warrantless wiretapping is pushing its online bill payments with a series of characters who are members of the Online Liberation Movement. Cute theme, with one super ironic character — Ms. Suspicious, who is worried about online privacy. Well, AT&T says she shouldn’t be because, with 128-bit encryption, her financial data is safe from prying eyes. Now if only her conversations were so secure.

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By Stacey Higginbotham
  1. Look like she is hiding the fact that she has a Mac :-)

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  2. @tinhat Well I guess that is ironic considering the Mac is “virus free” :)

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  3. It’s hard being a corporate – they get pilloried for being straight and look like dorks when they try and be funny

    lose/lose?

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  4. In fairness, AT&T online billing/pay experience is much better than Verizon’s…I have been able to auto pay by cc for years, view bill on line usually a day or two after bill drops etc. Verizon only recently went to auto pay by credit card and the set process was pretty bad, then it took them a month to set up, their on line bills are never up for at least a week after bill drops (and payment due date of course does not go back) Verizon still refers to its land line business as GTE legacy and their on line experience reflects it.

    Having said that this month the AT&T on line bill was 10 days late…may be they should fix that before advertising for more customers to use it:)

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  5. How does AT&T manage to “deliver” an online bill late? I’ve used Sprint’s online billing system for at least the last 3-4 years and bills are available online far before you recieve them in the mail and usually about a week or two before they are due.

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  6. COCOviper, I define the bill latency between date of the bill, and the day an email arrives to tell me the bill is available on line. This month, the ATT Wireless bill was for the period ended 6/18 and the email arrived on 6/28 – 10 days later. Normally the lag is only 3-4 days.

    Verizon is routinely 10=11 days from statement date to email notification. And often the payment data (probably accessing a different database table) is even less current.

    You can say I suffer from TBAD – telco bill anxiety disorder…because the bill each month is a surprise – what new fees and non-standard charges and new taxes did they tack on this time? :)

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