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Summary:

Liz Gannes who edits our NewTeeVee site skipped the company dinner to attend an event where Chad Hurley, co-founder of YouTube was going to reveal the entire story of YouTube. She caught the entire event on tape, and has the full report, a must see NTV […]

Liz Gannes who edits our NewTeeVee site skipped the company dinner to attend an event where Chad Hurley, co-founder of YouTube was going to reveal the entire story of YouTube. She caught the entire event on tape, and has the full report, a must see NTV for anyone who loves start-ups.

* If you can show growth such as a traffic hockey stick, your don’t need a PowerPoint to raise VC money.
* However hard you may try, it is hard to predict the future and your future infrastructure needs.
* Know who to sell and most importantly when to fold your hand.

If you wanted to read the story of less known YouTube co-founder Jawed Karim, click here. Watch Liz’s video.

  1. One word: pioneers.

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  2. I think Chad left out an important fact, he married Jim Clark’s daughter. Think maybe, just maybe that had something to do with their success.

    flash streaming and progressive downloading suck and it will be interesting to see how they turn a profit…

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  3. [...] The big missing variable here is what it actually costs to do human transcribing, a number that Antony admits he doesn’t know, and I don’t either. The real problem is that it is a cost that doesn’t benefit much from economies of scale: more users doesn’t mean cheaper transcribing. Antony continues: It seems more likely that the struggling venture market and the difficulty of raising capital in this environment drove the decision. If the free service is bleeding cash and the margins on the paid service can’t fund the expense, the company is not running a self-sustaining freemium model and needs venture capital to fund the loss. At the same time, they are showing investors a model that loses more money as it scales. This is much less attractive than in 2005 and 2006, where growth metrics were more important to many venture investors. [...]

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