Summary:

When talking mobile platforms, we tend to consider Symbian a separate platform along the lines of Palm, BlackBerry, Windows Mobile and iPhone. Now it’s official: Nokia, already a stakeholder in mobile OS maker Symbian, has announced that it will buy the remainder of the company and […]

When talking mobile platforms, we tend to consider Symbian a separate platform along the lines of Palm, BlackBerry, Windows Mobile and iPhone. Now it’s official:

Nokia, already a stakeholder in mobile OS maker Symbian, has announced that it will buy the remainder of the company and throw all the assets into a new platform called the Symbian Foundation, which will unite all the flavors of Symbian into a single, common software platform that will go open source in two years. Major mobile players such as Motorola, NTT DoCoMo, AT&T, LG Electronics, Samsung Electronics, STMicroelectronics, Texas Instruments and Vodafone have all signed on.

Om Malik offers considerable analysis of what the new Symbian Foundation means to the industry and its stakeholders. What do you think it means, if anything, to the mobile web worker?

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