5 Comments

Summary:

While 37signals recently added the oft requested ability to allow Basecamp users to reply to messages and comment notifications by email, a new add-on service called Mailmanagr takes that one step further by allowing you to create new project items as well. Create and assign custom […]

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While 37signals recently added the oft requested ability to allow Basecamp users to reply to messages and comment notifications by email, a new add-on service called Mailmanagr takes that one step further by allowing you to create new project items as well.

Create and assign custom email addresses to any area of your project and then forward messages, to-do items and milestones directly into your project without logging in. It’s very useful for forwarding emails you receive outside of Basecamp into the system or for making quick entries from your mobile.

If you have implemented Basecamp in your organization and are still seeing significant external email discussions, Mailmanagr can help get these items into the system for tracking.  If your folks are really that resistant to logging in though, you may want to consider if you have made the right choice to accommodate the work style of our clients and co-workers.

Mailmanagr uses the Basecamp API to faciliate all of this so it does require you to provide your login details. Take a tour to see if Mailmanagr is for you before signing up for your free account.

  1. Thanks for the write-up Scott!

    If your folks are really that resistant to logging in though, you may want to consider if you have made the right choice to accommodate the work style of our clients and co-workers.

    I think that’s a really interesting point: when people are making software decisions about something like Basecamp (or activecollab, wrike, whatever), who’s working style to you consider more strongly: the client, or your team?

    Basecamp is heavily used by small to medium-sized web shops (among others). It’s safe to say (although not universally true) that most people working internally in one of these organizations would be pretty comfortable working with a product like Basecamp; what should you do if you’ve got a client that isn’t though?

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  2. [...] subsequently contacted a couple of other blogs that, as web professional myself, I read regularly. Web Worker Daily today ran a piece about [...]

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  3. [...] integration with our other systems is critical. Earlier I reported on Mailmanagr and how it brings email integration to Basecamp. Today I get to report on BatchBook, my contact management app of choice, and the introduction of [...]

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  4. J Lane is right. When looking an application, companies take their internal working style into consideration. Most businesses heavily depend on email and manage projects with its help. Wrike used this fact an introduced its Intelligent Email Engine TM. Now Basecamp guys also noticed this fact. The major difference between Wrike and Basecamp email integration is that Wrike was originally developed with it and Basecamp needs add-on services.

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  5. @Alice McLane

    I’ll take that as a compliment if that’s the major difference (although I know that there are significant other differences between the way Wrike processes messages and the way Mailmanagr/Basecamp handles them).

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