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Summary:

The long-discussed “Versions” for the Mac is now open for anyone to download, for free (for now). It’s pretty slick. It’s not as awesome as the hype built it up to be, but it’s definitely worth checking out. Versions is an app that provides a strong […]

The long-discussed “Versions” for the Mac is now open for anyone to download, for free (for now). It’s pretty slick. It’s not as awesome as the hype built it up to be, but it’s definitely worth checking out.

Versions is an app that provides a strong GUI front-end for the “svn” (Subversion) command-line application. I, personally, prefer a GUI over command-line, but the benefits of Subversion were worth the hassle to me in my Cocoa development. We’ve discussed Subversion and its uses and benefits in quite a few places here on TAB before, so it’s nice to finally see an app like this come along.

Scott Stevenson had posted an earlier sneak peek of the app last week, and his comments area sparked a “war” of sorts amongst users of other version-control systems, saying that SVN is no longer “cool”.

John Gruber posted a quick ping yesterday, noting how nicely it works with Beanstalk, to provide a nice end-to-end solution for newbies.

Check out the Versions beta, and decide for yourself.

Update: Be careful about using it with any projects for which you already have version control activated in Xcode… the two apps, for some reason, don’t work in sync. I’m not entirely sure what the problem is, but Xcode will give errors for projects that Versions touches, and isn’t able to sync until you re-checkout the project (using Xcode). Versions also runs every single file, and freaks out when my PPC machine makes an extra or different build file than my Intel machine. Again, I don’t know what it’s doing – only that I’m going to keep using only Xcode for this project until the authors of Versions work to integrate the two programs better.

I also had a problem where my Versioning provider had an out-of-date ssl certificate, and it was throwing an error that required response, but I wasn’t given any way to respond in Versions, so I had to load up the command-line svn first to get around it. Versions needs a way to present possible options/answers to the cryptic errors that svn throws.

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By Jason Terhorst

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  1. I really love it. I never heard of it til yesterday and it works perfectly. I’m used to meld, which is brilliant, and the file comparison is far better than Versions but considering there doesn’t seem to be any competition (other than meld ported using macports) then I’m pretty happy.

    Anyone got any ideas on pricing for this come July?

  2. If my reading of the Versions pages is right they use embedded libsvn. It’s a guess but your problems with app incompatibility may be down to their using a libsvn from a newer version of Subversion than XCode. It has “upgraded” your working copy and XCode can no longer read the metadata.

  3. Hi,
    I’ve got a question about Quick time pro 7 but don’t know where to go with it. I used to put a copyright (not sure what to call it but something like watermark or annotation) on my videos edited with Quicktime Pro 6 but can’t do it with the new one.
    Any suggestions would be gratefully received,
    Nick

  4. Chris Sanders Saturday, June 6, 2009

    I’ve been using Versions now for about a month, and I love it. It makes things so easy to use and manage with other developers as well as designers. Sold, slick easy to use UI, done turn me over. I do have a question for anyone out, it’s about workflow with Versions and the best way to handle multiple clients in a repository but only allowing access to certain files developers when working on projects. I don’t want them 1) have access to other clients files and 2) if they try and download that project, I don’t want them have to download everyones files.

    Thanks
    Chris

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