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Summary:

London is one of those few fortunate cities to have a surfeit of telecom competition. From broadband providers to mobile operators, Londoners have a choice. They have decent broadband speeds as well as access to Wi-Fi and 3G networks. And as a result, there has been […]

broadbandlondonLondon is one of those few fortunate cities to have a surfeit of telecom competition. From broadband providers to mobile operators, Londoners have a choice. They have decent broadband speeds as well as access to Wi-Fi and 3G networks. And as a result, there has been a big change in their behavior. A new report from Ofcom outlines how Londoners (and the rest of the UK) are using these new wireless and broadband services. It’s a great example of how consumer behavior changes with bandwidth.

In London:

* 40 percent of people watch TV or video content online.
* 20 percent make VoIP calls.
* 32 percent are using their mobile phones to access the Internet.
* 19 percent listen to audio content on their mobiles.

Impressed? I am! I feel London has the user base to qualify as an always-on platform that will soon spur interesting applications, including many that are yet to be invented.

  1. Does anyone know what these numbers would be for people in the USA?

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  2. Nadeem Akhtar Monday, May 26, 2008

    The link to the Ofcom report is broken. Could you please fix as I would to have a look at the document.

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  3. It’s all well and good for Londoners, but for the rest of us (I live on the South coast)broadband is total crap because no-one will upgrade our ancient phone lines. No cable, no FiOS, just old oxidised copper crud. Things aren’t as advanced in the UK as they like to make out.

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  4. The 40% who watch TV online probably has a lot to do with the recent launch of the iPLayer by the BBC – in addition to the wide availability of broadband.

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  5. Richard H-S Tuesday, May 27, 2008

    Link needs a bit of fix. Report shows that UK in general is digitising fast. Bit puzzled by the 20% VOIP claim. Many may have tried but wonder how many still use. Perhaps this is the quetsion that we need to start asking ourselves?

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  6. Yes, please fix that link!

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  7. Interesting post Om,

    Of course, one of the problems with broadband here in the UK, is that it is typically either capped or metered. We usually get a set limit, and once this is used you have to pay extra. I get 50 gig a month at home with my provider, and pay around £28 (almost $60 US) If I go over, I have to pay a premium.

    This is in stark contrast to my experiences in the States last year, where my friends were using broadband based on the ‘all you can eat’ model – with faster connections and a lower monthly cost too.

    I also use 3g mobile broadband (on the ’3′ network) and am charged £25 around $48(US) for just 7 gig! That’s not a spelling error – SEVEN GIG for nearly fifty bucks!

    It’s good to have choice – I just wish there was some ‘serious’ price competition here.

    Jim Connolly
    The Tech News Blog

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  8. as soon as this april some states here in the USA will have a new wireless
    tech T-1 speeds 100% coverage under $20 a month we here in the USA. Have
    hade no true telecom competition because thay all charge around the same,
    $65 yo $99 a month

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  9. Hey guys at the end of the page for the report there are individual country breakdowns for UK and from there if you read the report you find the information. The link is correct.

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  10. The Ofcom report PDF has some interesting data. I’m in the UK so find this of particular interest.

    What I found more interesting was listening to Ofcom CEO James Thickett talking about the report and the data, and what it all means, in a video Ofcom created and posted to YouTube.

    They do this a lot. They understand conversational communication, it seems to me.

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