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The Wall Street Journal published an editorial this week in which it took offense to comments made by Vinod Khosla that have downplayed ethanol’s contribution to the food crisis. The WSJ said: “As long as he’s on the federal dole, perhaps Mr. Khosla should take a […]

The Wall Street Journal published an editorial this week in which it took offense to comments made by Vinod Khosla that have downplayed ethanol’s contribution to the food crisis. The WSJ said: “As long as he’s on the federal dole, perhaps Mr. Khosla should take a vow of embarrassed silence.”

Khosla was by no means pleased and sent out a response to a few news outlets, calling the op-ed “fiction writing.” We thought our readers would want to check it out in its entirety, so we reprinted the response in this nifty PDF format:


Vinod Khosla Responds to WSJ Article – Get more Free Whitepapers

  1. [...] this week the WSJ lambasted Vinod Khosla for down-playing the role of ethanol in the food crisis (we reprinted Khosla’s rebuttal here), according to research from New Energy Finance out next week, biofuels are “far from the [...]

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  2. [...] then put his money where his mouth is with big investments. His numerous plays in biofuel made him a recent target of the Wall Street Journal’s op-ed ire over the food crisis. But going out on a limb and taking a risk is how venture capitalists score [...]

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  3. [...] then put his money where his mouth is with big investments. His numerous plays in biofuel made him a recent target of the Wall Street Journal’s op-ed ire over the food crisis. But going out on a limb and taking a risk is how venture capitalists score [...]

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  4. [...] But it’s not just Bush. Other respected research firms have also cited similarly low numbers. In May, research firm New Energy Finance said biofuels are “far from the dominant” factor in rising food prices, and contributed an 8.1 percent increase in global average grain prices. (Although, the research did say sugarcane-based ethanol was found to have added a 70 percent increase in sugarcane prices in Brazil.) Cleantech investor Vinod Khosla, has, unsurprisingly, been a vocal critic of researchers and the media that he says have over-attributed the rise in food prices to biofuels (read his rebuttal to a WSJ editorial here). [...]

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  5. Khosla is indeed hard to please. http://rd3.ca

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