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Summary:

Is Net Neutrality essential for democracy? What role will AI have in the future of the web? What will Web 4.0 look like? On June 11, in an attempt to answer these and other questions, Tim Berners-Lee and other leading web authorities will gather at the […]

Is Net Neutrality essential for democracy? What role will AI have in the future of the web? What will Web 4.0 look like? On June 11, in an attempt to answer these and other questions, Tim Berners-Lee and other leading web authorities will gather at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, N.Y., for an old-fashioned debate with a social media twist: The content of the debate will be collaboratively created by web users, who can submit questions and promote them through a user-based ranking system similar to Digg. The most popular questions will form the basis of the debate, which will be webcast live. Viewers will also be able to interact with the panelists by submitting questions and comments in real time. For more details about this interactive event, plus instructions on how to submit and rank questions, go here.

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  1. Goodie gum drops, can’t wait to see what the “gods” with a crystal ball have to say.

  2. Business News Research » What Is the Future of the Web? – GigaOM Tuesday, May 20, 2008

    [...] What Is the Future of the Web? — [...]

  3. Well, I thought it was fun coming up with questions. I was surprised not to see more posted there. They could easily touch on all of the questions that were posted to the website. It’ll be interesting to see how they might pick and choose.

  4. Job Coaching from Tim Berners-Lee — VoIP Insider Wednesday, May 21, 2008

    [...] GigaOm mentions an upcoming interactive “round table” discussion being hosted by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute on June 11th called Tetherless World Research Constellation. The panel is comprised of academic and industry luminaries. [...]

  5. I think the future of the web is to be replaced by something better, just as it replaced the application protocols that came before it. We’ve been extending HTML for almost two decades now, rather than starting over from scratch and using all that knowledge for a clean sheet design. I’ve started blogging some of my ideas on what that new thin client might look like at the link above. Comments are welcome.

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