11 Comments

Summary:

I’ve used TextMate before, mostly for heavy development with PHP or Ruby on Rails, but it began to fall out of focus for me when I started using Panic’s Coda instead. I loved Coda’s interface more than any other text editor/web development application. But I lamented […]

Textmate I’ve used TextMate before, mostly for heavy development with PHP or Ruby on Rails, but it began to fall out of focus for me when I started using Panic’s Coda instead. I loved Coda’s interface more than any other text editor/web development application. But I lamented the ability to easily sync up my web work to my Subversion server, which I’ve fallen in love with. Xcode has the ability to manage versioning with Subversion in your projects, but this only works with the types of projects that Xcode handles.

I’m not a command-line kind of guy, even though I use Subversion. So I’ve tried to find some kind of GUI-based Subversion client. So far, the only one I’ve seen that’s available here and now was svnX. But the UI is irritating and confusing, making it pretty much unusable.

Then, I heard in passing from a friend that TextMate supports SVN. So I launched it up, and looked around. Sure enough, there it is – under the “Bundles” menu, and it’s the “Subversion” group. It has similar functionality to what Xcode has. Of course, you’ll want to import the project and perform the initial checkout via Terminal, but after that, you’ll be ready to go.

For easiest results, select the entire project’s folder from the “Open…” dialog in TextMate, to keep the whole thing at hand in TextMate.

By Jason Terhorst

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  1. http://zigversion.com/ is pretty good and the upcoming http://versionsapp.com looks pretty good too

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  2. We TextMate exclusively at our firm. And I agree, Coda is beautiful, but TextMate is much more mature and supports so much more stuff. Speaking of which, have you tried the Snipplr bundle for TextMate?

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  3. Here’s a quick tip. Go to your terminal, cd to your projects’ folder, type ‘mate .’ and it will open the folder as a new texmate project. Easy and disposable.

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  4. @Atratus thanks, now projects via FTP and all my textmate gripes are solved ;)

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  5. @Sjaq versions.app looks to be vaporware. how long has the beta been ‘coming soon’, way too long. that guy is too busy mac heisting and what not.

    i’m a fan of using TextMate’s svn and the command line. it’s a good one two punch!

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  6. [...] I would say your setup is probably mirrored by a lot of developers, including myself (Except I use Textmate, couldn’t get into [...]

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  7. [...] to me in my Cocoa development. We’ve discussed Subversion and its uses and benefits in quite a few places here on TAB before, so it’s nice to finally see an app like this come [...]

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  8. [...] Pro’s as our development machines. Rich Cavanaugh (our senior architect) and I both use TextMate and Terminal.app for our primary development. Our other developer, Rogelio Samour is a recent Mac [...]

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  9. “Of course, you’ll want to import the project and perform the initial checkout via Terminal, but after that, you’ll be ready to go.”

    Sounds nice, but how exactly do I do that?

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    1. type the following command in terminal, replace YOURSVNURL with the actual http:// or svn:// url for your svn repository.

      svn co YOUSVNURL

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