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I’m at the point where I now use Google for all of my calendar activities and I’ve convinced everyone in the family to do the same. We all share the calendars so everyone can see the “family calendar” at all times. This method comes in handy […]

BusysyncI’m at the point where I now use Google for all of my calendar activities and I’ve convinced everyone in the family to do the same. We all share the calendars so everyone can see the “family calendar” at all times. This method comes in handy with all of the activities the kids have, and since my son lives with his mother, we jointly use this approach for me to keep track of his events.Although it’s easy enough to hit the Google Calendar web interface, I also use iCal on my Mac. Back in February, I started using the beta of BusySync to keep iCal in sync with my Google Calendar and it’s been working great. It’s a full two-way sync so appointments can be created or edited in either Google Calendar or iCal. It also supports the family approach we use because you can view and sync multiple Google Calendars with it.BusySync 2.0 is now out of beta, so I’ll be pulling out the credit card for a full license. The cost is $25, but we early adopters can catch a break: buy before May 1 and the cost is just $19.95. In my mind the price is well justified for folks using Google Calendar and a Mac. You can see for yourself with a free 30-day trial.

  1. How does this compare to Spanning Sync?

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  2. It’s very comparable in terms of functionality, but one big difference is the price. BusySync is a one-time, license fee ($25). SpanningSync is a recurring yearly fee ($25) or a set amount for a lifetime subscription ($65).

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