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Summary:

I don’t know about you, but I’ve completely lost count of how many passwords I have online. 100? 200? I have no idea. And yes, I know, each of them should be unique as more and more of who I am and what I do ends […]

I don’t know about you, but I’ve completely lost count of how many passwords I have online. 100? 200? I have no idea. And yes, I know, each of them should be unique as more and more of who I am and what I do ends up on the web. But I’ve run out of my cat’s names, old teachers, places I like and even places I hate.

Enter a little bird to whisper a secure, but memorable password in my ear: PasswordBird.

PasswordBird is not going to set the web on fire, but if you’re at a loss for a reasonably strong password you just might remember, it’s perfect. Enter a name, a word and a date that’s special to you, and it will crank out a password that’s easy on your brain cells.

For example, I entered Santa Cruz, which made me think of ocean, which reminded me of March 3rd, 2000: PasswordBird cranked out:

  • oceruz2000
  • ruz2000ean
  • ocesan00

No registration, no request for your email, just the names of the guys who did this (Kevin Sheurs and Andrés Galante) and a couple of unobtrusive text ads. Sweet!

Of course, if you don’t want easy, there’s always PC Tools Secure Password Generator, which will crank out as many as 50 strong passwords faster than you can say rukUke2a.

By Bob Walsh

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  1. I’m not sure I understand why this is useful to someone who has 100-200 passwords.. Perhaps you could use passwordBird to create a master password for your password encryption vault?

    I just don’t see any other use for it.. a ‘secure’ password used 100 times is just as silly as an easy to guess password used 100 times.

    I love webworkerdaily.com, but this seems like a plug for some friends of yours. Or maybe you just really like shiny web 2.0ish pages regardless of their actual application in the web worker world?

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  2. I’m not sure why you wouldn’t just use RoboForm, which comes with an excellent password generator that can be configured to generate passwords that match different kinds of requirements. It also copies the newly generated password to your clipboard. Most important, it stores this new password for you so that you can always get to it, which is much more important than thinking up yet another password.

    I have to agree with Wayne. Is there no web 2.0 application that you don’t like?

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  3. Web workers are like sharks – they have to keep constantly swimming and consuming new web apps! Seriously, part of it is WWD; part of it is as developer, I always on the hunt for new Web 2.0 ideas.

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