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Summary:

Regular readers likely won’t learn much from this, but folks that have recently found us might benefit from an article I wrote for today’s New York Times. The gist is that even if you don’t have a new-fangled smartphone, you can still use that feature phone […]

Nytimes04032008

Regular readers likely won’t learn much from this, but folks that have recently found us might benefit from an article I wrote for today’s New York Times. The gist is that even if you don’t have a new-fangled smartphone, you can still use that feature phone to be productive on the run. Ranging from voicemail-to-text services, voice searching for information on the web, and capturing text with your cellphone camera, there are several, simple ways to get a few things done with your phone whenever you have a few spare minutes.As always, the NYT editors make me look better than I are… uh, am. And my standard disclosure applies: I’m paid a flat-fee from the NYT, so there’s no financial incentive for me to point you over there.

  1. Excellent article Kevin. Combining my two favorite web sites: NYT and JKTOR. You ARE the man!

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  2. OOPS….that’s what the “preview before post” is for. JKOTR of course.

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  3. Good stuff, Kevin.

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  4. I’m curious how you picked which companies to plug in your article? I have been using voice to text for a long time now and love it. In fact, I will get an iphone when it goes 3g and will not even consider visual voicemail. it is far inferior to voice to text, imho. But you only mentioned GotVoice and not some of their competitors like spinvox and simulscribe–both of which I’ve used and enjoyed. I’m a huge fan, but just wonder if there are more “disclosures” to be made here?

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  5. Valid question Michael. First on the subject of disclosures: the NYT has strict policies in terms of disclosures that I’ve signed my name to. I have no ties (financial or otherwise) to any of the companies mentioned. As far as how companies are picked: a freelance feature story is a morphing, fluid entity. I pitch a story idea (not a list of companies) and if the editors think the audience would benefit from said idea, we work together to flesh it out. In that process of back-and-forth (there’s a lot of this) we look for products and/or services that fit. We may come up empty and have to change the story idea.

    Unfortunately, it’s not possible to include every compelling service or product due to deadlines, word counts and several layers of editors. Hope that sheds a small amount of light on the process and explains why some companies aren’t mentioned. It’s not necessarily because they don’t provide a good solution (both that you mention do), but other constraints.

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