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Summary:

Carbon Sponge Box: Researchers at Tucson, Arizona’s Global Research Technologies have built a refrigerator-sized device that acts like a sponge for carbon emissions. Called the Atmospheric Carbon Capture Systems (ACCESS) Air-Capture System, the secretive material used captures carbon from the air (currently at a rate of […]

Carbon Sponge Box: Researchers at Tucson, Arizona’s Global Research Technologies have built a refrigerator-sized device that acts like a sponge for carbon emissions. Called the Atmospheric Carbon Capture Systems (ACCESS) Air-Capture System, the secretive material used captures carbon from the air (currently at a rate of less than 100 kilograms per day) and is meant to be clustered around places where carbon can be stored permanently. The sticking point is, “Because it uses electricity from the grid to separate gas from the solution, the prototype barely breaks even in CO2 savings.” — Popular Science.

Nanotubes to Fuel Cell: Lighten Up: Because fuel cells are rather complex, there always seems to be another little innovation discovered that can help out the tech. Researchers at Germany’s Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research and the University of Darmstadt are working on using carbon nanotubes to make fuel cells lighter. As Jadoo knows, lighter can deliver some interesting applications — Physorg.com.

Global Warming Sucks, and I Don’t Care: Knowledge can empower, but when it comes to global warming actually lead to apathy, says two Texas A&M University political scientists. The researchers only used a telephone survey of roughly 1,000 Americans, but still . . . . maybe our new carbon policy should include therapy sessions — EurekaAlert.org.

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  1. In the Lab: Carbon Sponge, Lighter <b>Fuel Cells</b>, Climate Apathy | Hydrogen Fuel Cell . Net Saturday, March 29, 2008

    [...] Nanotubes to Fuel Cell: Lighten Up: Because fuel cells are rather complex, there always seems to be another little innovation discovered that can help out the tech. Researchers at Germany’s Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research … Read More [...]

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