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Summary:

For the first time since comScore started releasing video stats, the number of videos watched online dropped in January, dipping to 9.8 billion from 10.1 billion in December. This decline falls in line with Nielsen’s January numbers, which also showed a dropoff. But January’s 9.8 billion […]

For the first time since comScore started releasing video stats, the number of videos watched online dropped in January, dipping to 9.8 billion from 10.1 billion in December. This decline falls in line with Nielsen’s January numbers, which also showed a dropoff. But January’s 9.8 billion is still higher than the 9.5 billion videos watched in November.

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Market leader YouTube (counted as part of all Google video sites) raised its share of videos viewed to 34.3 percent from 32.6 percent in December. comScore also found that the average viewer watched 70 videos in January, the average online video duration was 2.9 minutes, and the average viewer watched 206 minutes worth of video. Those numbers are approximately the same as the measurements for December.

  1. The problem with Comscore’s numbers is that it only looks at US visitors. Hitwise only reports US visitors too. When you take this kind of myopic view, its no surprise that the MSM sites are going to be on there. I’m more interested in global traffic and when you consider how many of those sites are banned outside the US, I can’t help but wonder if there are better independent sites that are actually doing more traffic.

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  2. Mefeedia.com jumped from 2 million uniques in Dec to 3.15 million uniques in Feb (worldwide – U.S. went to 1.5 million in Feb, although comScore always reports about 1/3 of what our internal, more accurate stats report). I don’t see it slowing down.

    The trend that we are seeing is that users are looking for more varied and unique content, and subscribing to more series than before. The initial novelty of web video is wearing off and now people want the niche / vertical content that will most interest them.

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  3. [...] NewTeeVee is reporting that the number of videos watched online and tracked by comScore showed a month-to-month drop for the first time, falling to 9.8 billion in January, from 10.1 billion in December. YouTube’s share of the total jumped to 34.3 percent for the month, up from 32.6 percent in December. Posted in General Erin Chat | RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI [...]

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  4. [...] Views Bounce Back in February Nielsen, which along with comScore had counted a drop in U.S. video traffic in January, says the sector recovered last month, with [...]

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  5. [...] has 34.3 percent of the U.S. online video market, according to comScore’s last count. Sanchez said he’d heard that when you take into account the expected economic [...]

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  6. [...] said it measured an increase in U.S. video views and video viewers for February, up 3 percent from January but not quite back to the record highs of [...]

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