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Summary:

Personal file storage, sharing and syncing is one of those categories of technology problems that, despite all efforts, no one ever seems to get right. But one service that comes pretty close is DropBox, which is available via a public beta today.

Personal file storage, sharing and syncing is one of those categories of technology problems that, despite all efforts, no one ever seems to get right. Most of the current offerings, even the better ones, leave something to be desired.

You’re always being asked to jump through one hoop or another: If you’re not constantly uploading and downloading files that you amend or need to amend, you’re being forced to use some special peer-to-peer software. But one service that comes pretty close to getting it all right is DropBox, which is available via a public beta today (of which there are 200 available for GigaOM readers using the code “om200.”)

Dropbox is basically an intelligent combination of Box.net, dot.mac and Microsoft’s FolderShare syncing service. It makes online storage and sharing of files dead simple — as simple as dragging files into specially market local folders.

The concept was cooked up by Drew Houston and Arash Ferdowsi, MIT dropouts and Y Combinator alumni who are running their three-person startup out of a studio apartment in San Francisco. For the past few months they’ve been working on polishing DropBox, the desktop software (client) and an online service.

The software, once downloaded, is simple to install (it works on both Windows and Mac) and integrates with the file browser. It runs quietly in the background. You create folders inside the DropBox folder and then just drag and drop them. And the files are constantly synced with your online storage locker — any time a file is changed, the changes are sent to the online folders, which can be accessed via a web browser even if your home machine is shut off. [Click here to watch the Screencast

What’s really cool is that the system keeps revised versions of the files as backup, just in case you accidentally erase or damage the “live” version of a document. You can click and share the “URLs” of every file with anyone by simply sending them an email (a feature that opens up viral growth opportunities for DropBox).

I met with Houston and Ferdowsi over the weekend and discussed their business plans. Once DropBox comes out of beta, they want to charge for storage — a refreshing thought amidst all the irrational chanting of “free.” The duo is looking to expand DropBox’s appeal to beyond the early adopters.

While it seems that everyone wants to develop a better syncing or storage or sharing technology, the population at large doesn’t seem to care, and is happy carrying (and losing) their files on their USB sticks or emailing them to themselves. When I noted that to the two young cofounders, they agreed. Their success, they said, lies in the ability to change mainstream behavior, and they are confident that the relative ease of use of their offering will win the masses over. To that we say good luck. DropBox is pretty good.

  1. Seems nifty. I’m going to give it a whirl. Thanks Om!

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  2. Hmm, how does this compare to AOL’s XDrive that allows you to “map” a drive in Windows directly to the online storage? Seems that’d be easier – what are your thoughts on that?

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  3. Looks simple and awesome! They maybe using Web-DAV behind the scenes.
    They are also being intelligent about only syncing changes to optimize bandwidth.

    Maybe these guys can become the network based “Time Machine”. I mean Apple does the same thing on the OS and Time machine backs data to an external hard drive.

    These guys can possibly do the same thing over to a network location, which quite frankly is much more reliable than Fry’s bought hard drive.

    What do you think OM?

    PS — Glad to see you back in action. Hopefully things are getting much better at your end.

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  4. I love what this looks like it can do, I’ll be trying it out but I won’t be sharing files with anyone! Isn’t that the point, you say? Sure but the license gives away ALL my rights, even if I only share with a select few. I guess they aren’t planning on using this in the enterprise!

    “While you own the content contained in Your Files, you hereby grant all other Dropbox users a non-exclusive, worldwide, royalty-free, sublicensable, perpetual and irrevocable right and license to use and exploit Your Files in your public folder.

    In addition, you hereby grant Dropbox users who have been given access to your shared folder a non-exclusive, worldwide, royalty-free, sublicensable, perpetual and irrevocable right and license to use and exploit Your Files in your shared folder.”

    Too scary, call off the lawyers boys!

    • Doug K.
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  5. Guys this a pretty awesome solution and far superior to X-Drive.

    Why? It is basically autosyncing the stuff, it is integrated into the file system on your local machine. and is constantly backing.

    they are using EC2 and S3 for their bakcend.

    @ Sheky, you are 100% right. They have the potential of being the network based time machine. I am guessing the cost of doing that is going to be prohibitive for now, but some telecom operator can license and offer it as a back-up solution.

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  6. Om,

    Yes cost is going to be an issue for ISPs. This may also get into the net neutrality debate. However I dont think after the first time (involving full backup), the subsequent updates utilize that much bandwidth. Especially if one is smart about updating only the changes. Frankly I would pay for such a service.

    Secondly they talk about enabling web based photo albums from the image files. It will be great if they did the same thing with my music and video data. So theoretically I can backup all my music/videos on dropbox and play it from other machines. This is somewhat like Lala but much better and no DRM hassles.

    Abhishek

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  7. There’s already a VERY good version of this available for free… Its called FolderShare and it works BEAUTIFULLY on both Mac and PC. I’ve been using it for over 2 years.

    http://www.foldershare.com

    Check it out!

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  8. @ Shekyboy, stay tuned for more interesting features with this service. along the lines of what you are dreaming of.

    @ SimonSays: this is an improvement on foldershare, which i am a fan of. Big difference is access from the web site to your files and ability to change, share and do more.

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  9. [...] including a code to get into the beta if you’re quick enough, hop over to our parent site GigaOm, where you can also see [...]

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  10. Isn’t this the same as Tubes, the company that Ray Ozzie had something to do with.. Whatever ever happened to them, they went from beta to nowhere?

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  11. [...] simply sending them an email (a feature that opens up viral growth opportunities for DropBox). Source Home page and cool video __________________ Battlefield Heroes Thread My FAQ on the SSC Jumper [...]

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  12. FYI– the beta code has expired. Guess I’m #201!

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  13. [...] Om just posted a review on a fabulous product for sharing files between your computers.  DropBox is a service that allows you to easily move documents and files between your different machines.  If you have ever used .Mac, this service feels a lot like iDisk. [...]

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  14. Om,

    Looks pretty damn good. What would make it killer is an API connection to Zoho, like box.net. Then the cloud would definitely come alive in a truly seamless way.

    But, in the meantime, great start by these guys.

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  15. Thanks for this post and the beta invite, great tool that I will probably use pretty regularly.

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  16. @Simon Says: I too love Foldershare, and depend on it all day, everyday. I’m concerned though, that 2+ years after the Microsoft buyout, it does not seem to be going anywhere. Is there evidence that it is still being actively developed? The Mac version still isn’t a universal binary.

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  17. @Om: is there a peer-to-peer aspect, or does everything get synched at the server? If so, what are the size limits, etc.? I use Foldershare to synch multi-multi gigs worth of files between home and work, with a smaller subset on my laptops.

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  18. @ Nitin

    I chatted with them about the API and they said maybe when they are big enough. They re a tiny operation and want to focus on making this a synch-share experience perfect.

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  19. @ David R,

    i don’t think they have any p2p aspect. I think there is a more of a client-server approach. they have a server that is “authentication” server which also monitors what has changed in a file and in an account and then issues commands to sync all that with the backend storage service that is Amazon’s S3.

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  20. @Om, thanks for the response. My next question is there S3 or mine? I’m guessing it’s the former, since requiring users to bring their own S3 accounts would greatly complicate the experience.

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  21. [...] available now and Drop Box is one of them. But it looks promising as other high profile blogs are praising a lot, i haven’t tested myself [...]

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  22. My biggest concern with software like this is what is the security and what is their policy when it comes to governmental requests for files? I have no intention of doing anything illegal, but it would be nice to know where these guys stand with keeping my data private and putting their customers first and foremost when it comes to legal requests for files…

    Are they gonna just crack open the vault at the slightest request?

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  23. I love that they x’d out the platypus in their demo video…Google has taken way too long to put this type of product out.

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  24. (There’s no exclamation point in Y Combinator.)

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  25. The answer is coming from Microsoft with our new VistaDropFiles 1.01!

    Look for it!

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  26. [...] GigaOM has a great write-up on Dropbox…and it looks like the beta started [...]

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  27. @David R. -

    http://www.foldershare.com – you’re in luck – there’s a new Foldershare beta secretly launched in the last couple of days. it took me by surprise as well. there is still a mac version, and the online portion has a new windows live interface. it looks exactly like skydrive, so i wouldn’t be surprised if they connected them together, which would provide both folder shares between your individual computers, between people, and synchronized with files in the cloud. the best of all worlds – but that sounds exactly like dropbox – thanks om! great find.

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  28. Check this out
    http://dl.getdropbox.com/u/1037/Clever.txt

    sneaky!

    :)

    come on in — http://getdropbox.com/beta/clever

    hurry, though, only the first 100 get in

    (if you’re especially sharp, and a great c++/python hacker, email us at jobs@getdropbox.com)

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  29. Great find Om. I am using Dropbox at the moment and I continue to be impressed by it. The interface and its simplicity beats everything else like Foldershare, Box.net by a big margin.

    @GigaOM readers if you are looking for Dropbox invites head over to http://dailyapps.net/2008/03/get-invites-for-the-gdrive-killer-dropbox/

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  30. This is easily the best execution of file synchronization/sharing yet! But I think the real action is in business users, who tend to demand more security and would be uncomfortable with storing certain files remotely. Beef up SSL and encryption and Dropbox can begin marketing to the segment with highest willingness to pay.

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  31. coolll

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  32. [...] Nag @ Startups.in was gracious enough to send out a prompt invite to Dropbox to my request. I just love the whole concept of storing all your stuff in a single repository that is accessible anywhere at any time. GigaOm has a detailed review of the service here. [...]

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  33. What level of encryption for storing and transfer of files? The demo reminded over everything you’d want the very clunky but very secure Shinkuro http://www.shinkuro.com/ to be.

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  34. [...] Via GigaOM [...]

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  35. It seems like a great new service with such a great improvement in user experience and interface.

    Does anyone know what kind of encryption are they using?

    How will you compare it Diino (which I’m using regurarly)?

    thanks

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  36. You guys must not be as paranoid as I am. There is no way I’m going to send my data to “3 guys from MIT”, no matter how snarky their screencast is! (I mean snarky in a good way :-), it made me laugh)

    Doesn’t anybody want just peer-to-peer sharing these days? What’s the big deal about getting at your files through the web interface of this or any of the equivalents? I don’t see that being beneficial, because the chance of me knowing in advance which of my bajillion files I actually would need when I’m away from boxes is close to zero. So I’d just need remote access, which could be done with LogMeIn or some such.

    And yeah, would be nice to see a big shout-out from them to SCPlugin, which it does look like they leveraged a lot. Which is good – open source rocks, but if they won’t open source DropBox, at least acknowledge the people whose shoulders you are standing on.

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  37. [...] News Is My First Read Every Morning - Techcrunch Drop.io: Simple Private Exchange - Lifehacker Drop It Like It’s DropBox - Gigaom The Best Stuff from MIX08 - Readwriteweb Dynamic Silverlight Launched: Ruby and more in [...]

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  38. [...] Higginbotham, Monday, March 17, 2008 at 9:00 PM PT Comments (0) Earlier this week Om wrote about Dropbox, which he liked so much that we at GigaOM are trying it out for our file-sharing and backup needs. [...]

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  39. Granted, this has online storage but I still find Foldershare has the edge because of the freebies offered. Anyway, has anyone heard of the latest kid on the block, Sugarsync?

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  40. I followed up with an article about FolderShare, Dropbox, and Syncplicity.

    http://www.brianberliner.com/2008/03/18/foldershare-dropbox-syncplicity-oh-my/

    Enjoy!

    -Brian

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  41. [...] reports the service ties into Amazon S3 for its online storage faculties and Wired notes that the trick [...]

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  42. [...] reports the service ties into Amazon S3 for its online storage faculties and Wired notes that the trick [...]

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  43. [...] There’s been a lot of talk about file syncing and sharing software lately. I wrote about Dropbox, while Stacey waxed eloquent about FolderShare. Another recent introduction is Sharpcast’s [...]

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  44. [...] There’s been a lot of talk about file syncing and sharing software lately. I wrote about Dropbox, while Stacey waxed eloquent about FolderShare. Another recent introduction is Sharpcast’s [...]

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  45. This tools can be wonderful, but I must be missing something because Novell had iFolder on the market years ago.

    It was secure and sync’d only changes made in files between as many computers as you wanted. It did assume you were running your own server though.

    Or am I totally off track?

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  46. Anyone have an extra invite. Would love to get away from SkyDrive.

    jasonheas[at]gmail[dott]com

    Thanks!

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  47. [...] GigaOm Published by admin Useful Websites, Web [...]

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  48. [...] couple weeks since we announced our private beta. Dropbox received great writeups in TechCrunch, GigaOm and Venturebeat and to our surprise, our screencast hit the top of both digg and reddit, with the [...]

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  49. [...] has received a ton of press coverage, including articles in TechCrunch and the GigaOm [...]

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  50. [...] out that its the online storage and sharing service that got a lot of favorable coverage (e.g., at GigaOm) in [...]

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  51. [...] all the reviews right now. Dropbox: The Online Storage Solution We’ve Been Waiting For? Drop It Like It’s DropBox – GigaOM DropBox makes online file storage and sharing more simple VentureBeat Digg – Google Drive killer [...]

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  52. Send an e-mail to sp00n1na70r+dropbox@googlemail.com to get an invite first 9 people get it

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  53. [...] are clearly superior (SugarSync, for example) or have nifty features such as automatic syncing (DropBox), but when viewed as a group, it’s hard to tell which one is going to emerge as the winner [...]

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  54. [...] that are clearly superior (SugarSync, for example) or have nifty features like automatic syncing (Dropbox), but when viewed as a group, it’s hard to tell which one is going to emerge as the winner [...]

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  55. [...] access to its storage drives through an iPhone app) a real competitive advantage against folks like Dropbox or FolderShare. I’m not sure I agree with him. He’s right when he says storage startups [...]

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  56. [...] aren’t enough. There is a need for sync with local duplicates, one the likes of SugarSync, Dropbox, Apple’s MobileMe and Microsoft’s LiveMesh are aiming to [...]

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  57. [...] latest version of VLC for video playback of files. I left installing Dropbox to the very  last – it is as simple to download and use and use as applying butter to bread. And that’s it: I was [...]

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  58. You can build this yourself:
    http://sourceforge.net/projects/ifolder3
    A nice tutorial:
    http://www.x2b4.com/howto/how-to-install-ifolder-on-ubuntu-server/

    Unlimited space and no fees :-)

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  59. Despite I miss some features, Dropbox rules.

    By signing up via this link – https://www.getdropbox.com/referrals/NTE4NjE5MDY5 – you’ll get 250 MB extra space.

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  60. [...] but that’s what it seems to be yielding for 2-year-old Dropbox. Simply put, people — including my GigaOM coworkers and I — love Dropbox because it works. “We do have a rabid following,” Dropbox CEO Drew [...]

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  61. [...] what it seems to be yielding for 2-year-old Dropbox. Simply put, people — including my GigaOM coworkers and I — love Dropbox because it works. “We do have a rabid following,” Dropbox [...]

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  62. Are you running out of 2GB free space? Here is a tip for you http://alturl.com/jmise

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