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Summary:

I was home yesterday with a sick toddler, so when I noticed the $18 million Series C funding for ultra-wideband chipmaker Tzero Technologies, I was powerless to blog it. Anytime the computer comes out, my daughter wants to hit YouTube for her favorite Teletubbies and Dan […]

I was home yesterday with a sick toddler, so when I noticed the $18 million Series C funding for ultra-wideband chipmaker Tzero Technologies, I was powerless to blog it. Anytime the computer comes out, my daughter wants to hit YouTube for her favorite Teletubbies and Dan Zanes clips, so no WordPress for me.

But it was a development worth noting, even a day later. Tzero’s funding follows on the heels of $24 million for Wisair last week. Although the hefty amounts aren’t a surprise (these are, after all, chip startups), the belief by their investors that UWB is still going to be a large market is. So far, I’m not convinced.

The technology promised life without wires, offering mouth-watering examples of TVs, camcorders and DVD players all wirelessly streaming video, but so far the only products on the market are Wireless USB hubs that connect my computer to my printer at speeds far below the promised 480 mbps. I already do that over a Wi-Fi network, so color me (and several other critics) unimpressed.

Although high-bandwidth applications such as video streaming, an area in which Tzero is making strides, hold promise, competitive technologies such as WirelessHD and even Wi-Fi are gaining ground. Printing a document in one minute vs. two isn’t that compelling of a value proposition, and while Tzero, WiQuest and Radiospire Networks are pushing HD video as a viable end market, that’s not a done deal, either. Ultra-wideband took a long time to get to market, and other wireless standards are catching up, so I’m not sure if consumers will demand it — even as speeds improve.

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By Stacey Higginbotham
  1. Jesse Kopelman Tuesday, March 4, 2008

    I think ultra-wideband, specifically Wireless USB, is a lot like Bluetooth. It’s long delayed, but will eventually be quite ubiquitous. Like most wireless technologies, the benefits are more quality of life than enabling some hitherto unavailable function. You don’t know you need a cell phone until you get one and start using it. You don’t know you need Bluetooth until you get a wireless headset and start using it. The only thing that made WiFi at all different, is that many users never even had a wired network at home, so they don’t even comprehend it as a replacement technology.

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  2. David Callisch Wednesday, March 5, 2008

    I agree with your take – UWB doesn’t have the legs that Wi-Fi does for solving the problem of getting HD video around the home, particularly as new 802.11n devices are coming to market. We actually blogged on this same topic quite some time ago, but it still has relevance: http://www.theruckusroom.net/2006/12/tzero_is_finall.html.

    Wi-Fi is already an established medium (more people now are buying Wi-Fi enabled devices than TVs) – UWB isn’t. That’s a big obstacle to get past.

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  3. [...] throughout a home, even without the line-of-sight requirements between transmitters used by current ultra-wideband efforts or the nascent WirelessHD movement. To call the data stream uncompressed is accurate, but to call [...]

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  4. [...] Association meeting in Austin learning about UWB as a wireless personal area network. I’m not a big believer in the technology so far, but was heartened by the admission of speakers who pointed out that the first implementations of [...]

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  5. [...] which has raised more than $70 million with a small amount coming earlier this year from SKTelecom; TZero, which raised $18 million in March led by CID Group; and Wisair, which raised $24 million in February led by Susquehanna Growth Equity. Radiospire is [...]

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  6. [...] Stacey Higginbotham | Thursday, November 20, 2008 | 9:15 AM PT | 0 comments Today, Ultra-wideband chip makers Artimi and Staccato Communications announced $20 million in funding and a merger agreement, which seems like tying two leaky boats together, giving them some more gas and hoping they make it to shore. The combination of Artimi and Staccato brings together the two UWB companies that were rumored to be running out of cash (as most of the other players had received cash earlier this year). [...]

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  7. [...] TZero Technologies has shut down, according to a story posted today by EETimes.  The chipmaker, which had raised $18 million back in March, joins at least two other defunct UWB startups that had hoped to use the wireless technology to [...]

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  8. [...] TZero Technologies has shut down, according to a story posted today by EETimes.  The chipmaker, which had raised $18 million back in March, joins at least two other defunct UWB startups that had hoped to use the wireless technology to [...]

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