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Summary:

I’m impressed. We here at GigaOM complain that the world needs a cheap, silicon-based 60 GHz chip to make wireless HD a reality, and scientists at Australia’s Melbourne University labs oblige. Others, such as Vubiq and SiBeam, are also trying. The Australian chip is tiny (5mm […]

I’m impressed. We here at GigaOM complain that the world needs a cheap, silicon-based 60 GHz chip to make wireless HD a reality, and scientists at Australia’s Melbourne University labs oblige. Others, such as Vubiq and SiBeam, are also trying. The Australian chip is tiny (5mm a side), relatively cheap (less than $10) and can transmit data about 10 meters. That may not wirelessly stream an HD movie across the living room of an American McMansion, but we’re getting close.

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By Stacey Higginbotham

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  1. I read the links to all three, and it looks like 60 GHz is coming fast. Looking closely at all three press releases, though, I see that even though the Australians have made this announcement, they state that they are still a year away from making it available to the public. SiBeam’s announcement seems closer, stating that development kits will be available to “select customers” in the first quarter of 2008. Only Vubiq appears to be actually taking orders right now, with their development systems available for $12,500. Does anyone out there have more information about SiBeam and Vubiq?

  2. metarand » Australia At Forefront in 60GHz CMOS SOC Friday, February 22, 2008

    [...] coverage here and here. Share and [...]

  3. Stacey Higginbotham Friday, February 22, 2008

    Dan, I’m talking with Vubiq on Monday and hope to share more details from them next week, along with info from SiBeam. Berkeley also has a research group looking at CMOS 60 GHz chips.

    http://bwrc.eecs.berkeley.edu/Research/RF/ogre_project/

  4. Too Many Signals: Delivering Wireless HD Video – GigaOM Sunday, March 30, 2008

    [...] Other startups include SiBeam, which plans to have chips out this year. There are also various university research efforts a focused on this. It’ll probably be a few years before this technology makes it into [...]

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