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IBM is using DNA to ferry carbon nanotubes to make chips. Meanwhile, bug protein may soon be used to provide us with terabytes of data on a DVD. It all sounds so futuristic and creepy, but despite the fanfare, using biology as a storage medium or […]

IBM is using DNA to ferry carbon nanotubes to make chips. Meanwhile, bug protein may soon be used to provide us with terabytes of data on a DVD. It all sounds so futuristic and creepy, but despite the fanfare, using biology as a storage medium or microfab is hard. Unlike a mechanical tool, biology adapts, morphs and can mutate, resulting in manufacturing problems.

However, there’s a reason science is pouring money and brainpower into proteins. DNA, which keeps terabytes of data tightly wrapped in a double helix packed inside every cell, is an incredibly efficient storage medium. With Moore’s Law demanding more transistors packed on a chip, the idea of DNA computers has taken hold as a means to get past 10 nanometers (right now chipmakers are starting their production of 45 nanometer chips). In other words, organic computing is poised to get a lot more organic.

  1. I’m always skeptical when new technology claims to take us beyond Moore’s Law, because Moore’s Law has outlived even the most optimistic forecasts for its demise.

    Not saying it will go on forever, but I’m not convinced 10 nm is the limit, any more than 1 micron was 25 years ago. (I remember those claims!)

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  2. Nanotechnology is definately going to push Moore’s law to the limit.

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  3. [...] around Moore’s Law. Of course, they’ve made that claim in the past with some of their DNA chip research. Maybe they just want a law named after someone who works at Big Blue? Rating: None Thumbs Up [...]

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  4. [...] panic just yet. The chip industry has withstood recessions, changes in business models and even tries to circumvent the laws of physics, so there’s still hope. Here are a few bright spots that should help the industry find its [...]

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