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Summary:

Earlier this today I stumbled upon this video from Samsung demonstrating how web content can be married to the television signals being broadcast live via their set-top box. They call it See-N-Search. The set-top box also has the ability to pull multimedia content, aka videos off […]

Earlier this today I stumbled upon this video from Samsung demonstrating how web content can be married to the television signals being broadcast live via their set-top box. They call it See-N-Search.

The set-top box also has the ability to pull multimedia content, aka videos off the Internet and give more context to what you are watching. I think this is an interesting development, because it blurs the line between web video and old TV.

I think if this See-N-Search technology does actually become popular, a lot of people with little time (or interest) in online video will suddenly be unknowingly exposed to it, giving the whole online video industry a nice boost. That said, this little video also reminds us that we need better cataloging technology and better metadata around online video for See-N-Search type contextual systems to be effective.

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  1. Interesting but not really useful. Samsung is attempting to add the web to the TV. But I think a better approach would be to link the TV and the PC (who needs another box?). The PC already has access to the internet, and a whole lot more (not to mention a keyboard!).

    I think that within the next few years new PCs will have a built-in ability to project the screen wirelessly to your TV. Not only will you have access to the web, but also your photo albums, DVD player, and whatever else is on your machine.

    http://RSSLiveTV.com – a quick and easy way to tune into internet television

  2. I’m not sure if it’s gonna to get very popular. Maybe?

  3. I finally setup my Wii last night. Within 10 minutes, i was watching My Queue of web video over at mefeedia.com !!!

    I am not sure why manufactures don’t follow Nintendo’s lead and just build in wireless connectivity and a web browser. The only complaint is that Nintendo made it a few extra steps (had to pay a one-time $5 for the “Internet Channel”) to make this happen. They probably lose 75% of Wii owners this way – but still, Mefeedia receives thousands of Wii browsers a month!

  4. Wow! I was underwhelmed until the end when they showed the separate tablet. I wonder if the web pages pop up on the screen or the tablet. Hopefully the tablet, so you can continue watching TV while browsing. So simple even grandma could do it.

    Problems? You have to wait until your cable company issues the set top boxes (five years? ten?) and I guess we’ll see a big Search Engine Optimization war to get your web page to the top of the “TV listings.” Or worse, “For pr0n click here!.”

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