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Nielsen released new data today showing that DVRs are increasing the amount of television being watched, and that women are the real power users. Since 2005, DVRs have helped spur a 3 percent bump in TV viewing at 9 p.m. and a 5 percent boost between […]

Nielsen released new data today showing that DVRs are increasing the amount of television being watched, and that women are the real power users.

Since 2005, DVRs have helped spur a 3 percent bump in TV viewing at 9 p.m. and a 5 percent boost between 11 p.m. and midnight. Viewers are also pushing back the traditional boundaries of “prime-time,” as people record shows and watch them later that same night.

The people using DVRs the most, or “heavy shifters,” are 18- to 49-year-old middle income women who record and later watch 26 hours of TV a week. And what are they heavy shifting? Oprah, soap operas and reality shows.

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  1. ABC’s New On-Demand Disables FFWD « NewTeeVee Tuesday, February 26, 2008

    [...] It’s a classic example of traditional media’s backward thinking: Attack convenience (and by extension, the viewer) rather than examining your own antiquated business models that gave birth to the technology in the first place. And recent studies regarding DVR use show the technology isn’t all bad for broadcasters. While one study found that 65 percent of DVR users always skip the commercials, another showed that DVRs have actually served to increase TV watching. [...]

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