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Summary:

Digital minimalists got a big lift this morning when Microsoft, Google, VeriSign and IBM all said they’d begin supporting OpenID, the open-source standard that seeks to enable consumers to use a single identity and password to log in to any web site on the Internet. The […]

Digital minimalists got a big lift this morning when Microsoft, Google, VeriSign and IBM all said they’d begin supporting OpenID, the open-source standard that seeks to enable consumers to use a single identity and password to log in to any web site on the Internet.

The idea of a universal ID to simplify consumer’s lives has been around for some time. But many companies have been unwilling to let go of that last connection to their end users, the one-off login required to access each site. With today’s endorsement, OpenID’s potential base has been pushed to nearly 1 billion users.


And OpenID is proving to be a huge windfall for at least one startup: Tulsa, Okla.-based Vidoop, which we introduced here in October. Vidoop’s consumer play, called MyVidoop, uses images rather than letters or numbers to create OpenID logins. The images are handy in one critical way: Vidoop sells them to advertisers.

Vidoop has been a huge supporter of OpenID from the start, if for no other reason than to enable MyVidoop users to go as many places as possible. Translation: bigger ad rates. Of the 10,005 web sites that currently support OpenID, Vidoop shares ad revenues with all of them. And Vidoop has hired the chairman of the OpenID Foundation, Scott Kveton, as its VP of open platforms.

I had dinner with Vidoop co-founder Luke Sontag last night. He was outspoken, as usual, on the virtues of OpenID, but also on how Microsoft’s bid for Yahoo makes today’s development even richer for him:

“For Vidoop, the Microsoft deal means one less potential partner that we have to explain the importance of ‘corporate grade authentication’ to,” he said. “I’ve always wondered why big companies get great access security, but the consumer companies give us no more protection than a measly password.

“A password that even Bill Gates has acknowledged is the weakest link in online security,” he said.

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  1. Microsoft, Google, IBM y VeriSign también apoyan OpenID Thursday, February 7, 2008

    [...] Enlace: OpenID Has Big New Friends. [...]

  2. OpenID is long overdue, a great idea that deserves rapid adoption. More on my blog at http://ikeelliott.typepad.com/telecosm/2008/02/microsoft-and-g.html

  3. IdentityBlog – Digital Identity, Privacy, and the Internet’s Missing Identity Layer Monday, February 11, 2008

    [...] set to ease      WebProNews.com Microsoft, Google Sign On To OpenID David Utter      GigaOM OpenID Has Big New Friends Carleen Hawn      Real Tech News Microsoft, Google, Verisign, Yahoo! and IBM Join OpenID’s [...]

  4. A first introduction to OpenID « YC’s ramblings Tuesday, February 12, 2008

    [...] is my completely non-technical explanation of OpenID. I felt after all the OpenID buzz last week there was a need for such, seeing that even the BBC wrote a story that [...]

  5. Will OpenID Support Help Defensio Squash Blog Spam Better? – GigaOM Tuesday, February 19, 2008

    [...] spam blocker Defensio recently introduced support for OpenID, which is on the upswing after being endorsed by a number of industry heavyweights. OpenID lets Defensio track posters’ behavior. In theory, knowing someone’s commenting [...]

  6. A first introduction to OpenID « Learning in Linux Saturday, February 7, 2009

    [...] is my completely non-technical explanation of OpenID. I felt after all the OpenID buzz last week there was a need for such, seeing that even the BBC wrote a story that [...]

  7. remote access software Wednesday, August 19, 2009

    “The images are handy in one critical way: Vidoop sells them to advertisers.

    Vidoop has been a huge supporter of OpenID from the start, if for no other reason than to enable MyVidoop users to go as many places as possible. Translation: bigger ad rates.”

    Are the bigger ad rates because the more websites a user visits with the Vidoop openID simply means more ads served by Vidoop, or are you alluding to advanced targeting? If Vidoop controls the password for all these sites, they can compile data on individual user trends, and serve them relevant ads extremely effectively.

    Think minority report eye-scan based ads.

    So long as they’re responsible with the data, no problem. But I’m mainly just curious if that’s what you meant, or the simpler more websites = more ads?

    1. How about using your name on the comment instead of promoting your software/service on the blog.

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