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Summary:

What if any page on the Internet – any web application, shared document, blog – had a back side you could use to track what you wanted to and be able to easily share that with your fellow web workers via email, for free? That’s what […]

What if any page on the Internet – any web application, shared document, blog – had a back side you could use to track what you wanted to and be able to easily share that with your fellow web workers via email, for free? That’s what the new startup Lunarr does, cross platform, cross browser, with no browser plugin.

Take for instance a Google doc: pop it into Lunarr (if you get accepted to the beta program) and work on it as usual. Then, click on the page turn in the upper right hand corner and you flip to the back side of your doc where you can invite collaborators, link supporting documents, track revisions and see who’s seen your latest version. Lunarr works with any URL, not just Google docs, can display (but not edit) Microsoft Word and Excel files, or use one of its own templates.

Let’s say you’re working with a fellow web worker, kicking around ideas for a redesign of a web site. You could go back and forth in email or IM, but how do you keep all those collaborative bits together? With Lunarr, you just flip to the back side of that URL, email invite your colleague, and Lunarr manages the back and forth for you.

“The front page can be anything, we tried to make it very flexible,” said Hideshi Hamaguchi, COO of Lunarr. “You add a back page you can flip to where you can send that page to a friend and say ‘Oh, this is great web site, so why don’t we use this?’ or whatever. For instance, you can use a Google calendar with your team, and you can flip, and send a message to your team, ‘I’d like to have a meeting on this date, but it looks very bad. Can we free up some time?”

For the rest of 2008 Lunarr is free; Lunarr will begin offering a commercial version for somewhere around $10/month in early 2009, with an enterprise version soon after.

Lunarr is all about the collaboration that goes on around a document or web page, rather than collaborating inside that page – if much of your daily web work revolves around discussing, approving, supporting and reviewing web pages or files within a group of people who live in their email client, Lunarr is definitely attractive.

  1. [...] web. So when Hideshi Hamaguchi and Toru Takasuka of Lunarr, a startup I’d written about for Web Worker Daily invited me to join 3 well-known bloggers for a weeklong visit to Tokyo and Japan’s growning [...]

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