Summary:

Open Source Search – Wikia Search, the search project from the same folks who brought you Wikipedia, has launched in alpha form. They say right up front that the current results are pretty bad, but their plan is to refine them based on user feedback. For […]

ScreenshotOpen Source Search – Wikia Search, the search project from the same folks who brought you Wikipedia, has launched in alpha form. They say right up front that the current results are pretty bad, but their plan is to refine them based on user feedback. For starters, any user can contribute (or refine) a “miniarticle” to appear at the top of a group of search results; if you think you know a lot about goldfish or gangsters or whatever, you can introduce the search results for that term.

There’s also a bit of social network mixed in here; you can create a user profile and add your own photo and interests and other descriptive information, and then associate yourself with search pages, as well as start to build a network of friends. It remains to be seen whether they can take a serious run at other people-powered search engines like Mahalo, let alone the search juggernaut that is Google, but it’s refreshing to see an alpha launch that actually is early enough for user feedback to make a difference.

Reduce Email Clutter – Lots of sites these days want to confirm registration via email, and you always have to wonder whether it’s good to give them your real email address. With Slopsbox, you just use any address you like @slopsbox.com and then pick up the (incoming only) mail through their web interface. We’ve covered similar services before; the new feature here is that Slopsbox lets you add your own domains to their list. So if you have a domain hanging around that you don’t use for email (and all too many web workers have a spare domain or twenty), you just adjust its MX record and then you can pick up its email the same way via the Slopsbox web site.

Bad Day at the Office – This amusing little compilation video has been making the rounds, but if you’re not one of the two million folks who have seen it on YouTube already, take five minutes and have a look. I’m sure most of the office meltdowns it shows are staged, but even so, you can bask in the happy feeling that as a web worker you’re exempt from much of this stuff.

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