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Summary:

While we’ve been busy compiling the cleantech trends of 2007 and predicting those of 2008, we’ve been admiring some of the end of the year lists compiled by our ecoblogging peers. Here’s a list of our favorites we’ve been mulling over so far: The Year in […]

While we’ve been busy compiling the cleantech trends of 2007 and predicting those of 2008, we’ve been admiring some of the end of the year lists compiled by our ecoblogging peers. Here’s a list of our favorites we’ve been mulling over so far:

  • The Year in Energy via MIT Tech Review: Tech Review does a great job of compiling the five most notable energy trends of 2007. Biofuels rose and struggled, solar panels are getting cheaper, we’re figuring out more ways to manage and recycle carbon, energy storage systems are getting better, and vehicles are getting more efficient. Will these trends continue in 2008?
  • The Top Renewable Energy Stories of 2007 via Renewable Energy Access: “With 31 gigawatts of renewable energy developed around the world, 17 billion dollars in global market transactions and 21 billion dollars in global venture capital invested in new companies in 2007, clean energy can no longer be considered an “alternative” — it is simply the natural evolution of energy.” Renewable Energy Access picks their favorites stories they wrote from 2007. Our fav from their list? Their Citizenre expo.
  • R-Squared Blog’s Top Energy Stories of 2007: Check out this extensive list, which keeps on growing. Also posted on Oil Drum.

  • The 25 best performing stocks of the Bloomberg World index in 2007: Thin film solar darling (so-called Google of Solar) First Solar (FSLR) was in the Top 25, up 811% on the year! — Seeking Alpha.
  • Ten Alternative Energy Speculations for 2008: LEDs and Ultracaps (the first part of three) via Alt Energy Stocks — “This article is for the gamblers,” the post notes, but the bets don’t sound all that bad to us. Cree (CREE), Lighting Science Group (LSGP.OB), and Maxwell Technologies (MXWL) — Alt Energy Stocks.
  • IT Industry Predicts Trends for 2008: A solid list of predictions for how clean energy and energy efficiency will help the IT industry, from Infoworld. InfoWorld also pens a nice Year in Green for the IT crew.
  • The WSJ’s 2007 Year In Photos: Everyone’s favorite Nobel Peace prize winning climate change advocate (and now Kleiner partner) Gore gets a shot gorepeaceprizephoto1.jpg
  • Update, more year wrap ups from around the web:

  • The Ultimate Green Year in Review 2007: Jetson Green brings us a year in review that takes almost a year to read — whew!
  • The Oil Drum’s Year in Metrics: The Oil Drum has a 2007 year in review that’s got loads of charticles! — we’re visual learners — The Oil Drum.
  • Tobias Levkovich’s 8 Key Concerns and Questions for 2008: Citigroup’s (C) chief U.S. equity strategist blogs about eight concerns, questions and outcomes for next year — Seeking Alpha.
  • Greentech Media’s Year in Review: Some trends and top stories from the GTM folks.
  1. Glad you like the Renewable Energy Access expo on CitizenRE. Just for clarity, I’ll take credit for that article. RE Access encouraged me to research and write it, but it was all my own. It was what needed to be done to help the overall industry, and few others were stepping up to take action on the issue. Many months later now, CitizenRE is making the same claims, but has eliminated references to dates when they might actualy make their claims true.

    Meanwhile, my company, groSolar, has actually secured additional public financing and is continuing our national expansion with real products and real services today. We continue to take action to grow the industry and create forward-looking policies and practices so that the solar industry can perform as well as it needs to in our fight against climate change.

    Jeff Wolfe, CEO, groSolar

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  2. Green energy is definitely the best solution in most cases. Technology like solar energy, wind power, fuel cells, zaps electric vehicles, EV hybrids, etc have come so far recently. Green energy even costs way less than oil and gas in many cases.

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