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A bevy of recent research sheds light on a variety of topics including ad effectiveness, the types of content being watched (or desired), and how the younger generation is interacting with online video. All the stats bode well for this business and end the year on […]

A bevy of recent research sheds light on a variety of topics including ad effectiveness, the types of content being watched (or desired), and how the younger generation is interacting with online video. All the stats bode well for this business and end the year on a high note.

On the ad front, research from Palisades Media Group says that DVRs are not making a major impact on commercial viewing. The study shows that less than half of people watching their DVR reported fast-forwarding through ads and more than half of the shows recorded during prime time were watched the same day of recording. This is good news for advertisers with time-sensitive commercials.

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MediaPost covered new research from Simmons that showed consumers are 46 percent more engaged in ads they see during TV shows online than they are in the ads watched during shows on traditional television sets. The study also said viewers are 25 percent more engaged in the content of the shows being watched online than they are when they watch shows on TV.

With just days until the Iowa caucus, research from Harris Interactive reveals that 62 million people, or one third of all adults who watch video online, have watched a political video on the Web. Democrats are more likely to watch online political videos than Republicans, and of those who have watched a political video online more than half say they watched the videos to help decide who they will support.

Another recent study from Harris Interactive shows that online video viewers are very interested in watching more full-length TV episodes and feature-length films online. Thirty percent of respondents said they would watch “a lot more” TV shows if they were available on the Web. Harris’ research also found that 65 percent of online adults have watched a video on YouTube, up from 42 percent last year.

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And finally, Pew / Internet reports that more teenagers are creating content. Sixty-four percent of teens aged 12 – 17 online are involved in at least one type of content creation. Boys far outnumber girls when it comes to posting video online; 19 percent of teen boys have posted videos for someone else to see compared with 10 percent of girls.

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  1. Higher engagement levels for web video should come as no surprise. Watching TV is a passive activity. One done in conjuntion with flipping though a magazine or checking email. Watching TV online (at this point in time), is inherently more engaging. The viewer must actively seek out the programming and commit to it.

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  2. [...] according to this article on NewTeeVee, research from Palisades Media Group says that less than half of people with DVR’s reported [...]

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  3. [...] 9 percent gap between male and female Internet users falls in line with previous Pew research showing that 19 percent of online teen boys posted video online to share while only 10 percent of [...]

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  4. [...] however, contradicts earlier research. Back in December, Palisades Media Group reported that less than half the people watching TV on their DVRs fast-forwarded through commercials. Fast-forward to [...]

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